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More buttons reside on the right side of the back panel, as shown in Figure 2.11.

The key controls and their functions are as follows:

■ Diopter adjustment knob. Rotate this knob to adjust the diopter correction for your eyesight.

■ Multi-controller knob. This joystick-like button can be shifted up, down, side to side, and diagonally for a total of eight directions, or pressed. It can be used for several functions, including AF point selection, scrolling around a magnified image, trimming a photo, or setting white balance correction.

■ AF-ON. Press this button to activate the autofocus system without needing to partially depress the shutter release. This control, used with other buttons, allows you to lock exposure and focus separately: Lock exposure by pressing the shutter release halfway, or by pressing the AE Lock button; autofocus by pressing the shutter release halfway, or by pressing the AF-ON button.

■ AE/FE (auto exposure/flash exposure) lock/Thumbnail/Zoom Out button. This button has several functions, which differ depending on the AF point and metering mode. You can find more about these variations in Chapter 4.

In Shooting mode, it locks the exposure or flash exposure that the camera sets when you partially depress the shutter button. The exposure lock indication

(*) appears in the viewfrnder. If you want to recalculate exposure with the shutter button still partially depressed, press the * button again. The exposure will be unlocked when you release the shutter button or take the picture. To retain the exposure lock for subsequent photos, keep the * button pressed while shooting.

When using flash, pressing the * button fires an extra preflash that allows the unit to calculate and lock exposure prior to taking the picture.

In Playback mode, press this button to switch from single-image display to nine-image thumbnail index. Move among the thumbnails with the Quick Control Dial. When an image is zoomed in, press this button to zoom out.

Figure 2.11

Diopter adjustment knob

Multi-Controller knob «

Quick Control Dial

Set button

On/Off/Quick Control Dial Switch

Activate AF button

AE Lock/ FE Lock/Index/ Reduce Image button

Activate AF button

AE Lock/ FE Lock/Index/ Reduce Image button

Figure 2.11

Diopter adjustment knob

Multi-Controller knob «

Quick Control Dial

Set button

On/Off/Quick Control Dial Switch

AF Point Selection/ Enlarge Image button

Compact Flash access lamp

AF Point Selection/ Enlarge Image button

Compact Flash access lamp

■ AF Point Selection/Zoom In button. In Shooting mode, this button activates autofocus point selection. (See Chapter 4 for information on setting aut-ofocus/exposure point selection.) In Playback mode, this button zooms in on the image that's displayed, or the highlighted thumbnail index image.

■ Access lamp. When lit or blinking, this lamp indicates that the Compact Flash card is being accessed.

■ Quick Control Dial. Used to select shooting options, such as f/stop or exposure compensation value, or to navigate through menus. It also serves as an alternate controller for some functions set with other controls, such as AF point.

■ Set button. Selects a highlighted setting or menu option.

■ ON/OFF switch. Rotate counterclockwise to the ON position to turn the 40D on with the optional features of the Quick Control Dial deactivated. (Which some users prefer for simplicity; most don't bother with this.)

■ Quick Control Dial switch position. Rotate the ON/OFF switch all the way counterclockwise to this position to activate the Quick Control Dial.

■ LCD. View your images and navigate through the menus on this screen.

Going Topside

The top surface of the Canon EOS 40D has its own set of frequently accessed controls. The three of them just forward of the status LCD panel have dual functions and are marked with hyphenated labels. Press the relevant button (you don't need to hold it down) and then rotate the Main Dial to choose the left function of the pair, such as Metering Mode, Autofocus, or ISO, and the Quick Control Dial to select the right function, such as white balance, drive mode, or flash exposure compensation. The settings you make will be indicated in the LCD status panel, which is described in the section that follows this one. The key controls, shown in Figure 2.12, are as follows:

■ Mode Dial. Rotate this dial to switch among Basic Zone and Creative Zone modes, and to choose one of the Camera User Settings (C1, C2, or C3). You'll find these modes and options described in more detail in Chapter 4.

■ Sensor focal plane. Precision macro and scientific photography sometimes requires knowing exactly where the focal plane of the sensor is. The symbol on the side of the pentaprism marks that plane.

■ Flash hot shoe. Slide an electronic flash into this mount when you need a more powerful speedlight. A dedicated flash unit, like those from Canon, can use the multiple contact points shown to communicate exposure, zoom

Sensor Metering Autofocus ISO/Flash LCD

focal Mode/White Mode/Drive Exposure Status plane Balance button button Compensation Panel button

Sensor Metering Autofocus ISO/Flash LCD

focal Mode/White Mode/Drive Exposure Status plane Balance button button Compensation Panel button setting, white balance information, and other data between the flash and the camera. There's more on using electronic flash in Chapter 7.

■ LCD Illuminator button. Press this button to turn on the amber LCD panel lamp that backlights the LCD status panel for about six seconds, or to turn it off if illuminated. The lamp will remain lit beyond the six-second period if you are using the Mode Dial or other shooting control.

■ Metering Mode-WB button. This button has two functions. Rotate the Main Dial after pressing this button to change between Evaluative, Partial, Spot, or Center-Weighted metering. Rotate the Quick Control Dial to cycle among AWB (Automatic White Balance), Daylight, Shade, Cloudy/Twilight/ Sunset, Tungsten, White Fluorescent, Flash, Custom, and Color Temperature. You'll find more information about customizing white balance in Chapter 3.

■ AF-Drive button. Press once and then rotate the Main Dial to change between One Shot, AI Focus, and AI Servo autofocus modes (you'll find more about those modes in Chapter 5). Drive mode settings include Single Shot, High Speed Continuous (up to 6.5 fps), Low Speed Continuous (up to3 fps), and 10- or 2-second Self-Timer, selected by holding down the button and rotating the Quick Control Dial.

■ ISO/Flash Exposure Compensation button. Press and rotate the Main Dial to choose an ISO setting; use the Quick Control Dial to change electronic flash exposure compensation. You'll find more about ISO options in Chapter 3, and flash EV settings in Chapter 7.

■ Monochrome LCD status panel. This LCD readout provides information about the status of your camera and its settings, including exposure mode, number of pictures remaining, battery status, and many other settings. I'll illustrate all these in the next section.

■ Main Dial. This dial is used to make many shooting settings. When settings come in pairs (such as shutter speed/aperture in manual shooting mode), the Main Dial is used for one (for example, shutter speed), while the Quick Control Dial is used for the other (aperture).

■ Shutter release button. Partially depress this button to lock in exposure and focus. Press all the way to take the picture. Tapping the shutter release when the camera has turned off the auto exposure and autofocus mechanisms reactivates both. When a review image is displayed on the back-panel color LCD, tapping this button removes the image from the display and reactivates the auto exposure and autofocus mechanisms.

WHO'S GOT THE BUTTON?

If you're a veteran of the Canon EOS 30D era, you've probably noticed that only a few controls received new assignments when the 40D was designed. The three top panel buttons are the most notorious culprits. With the 30D, the pairings were as follows: AF Mode/White Balance; Drive Mode/ISO; and Metering Mode/Flash Exposure Compensation. On the theory that the most-used features should be controlled by the Main Dial (and thus reside first in the button pairings), the 40D redesign moved the lesser-used Drive Mode option to the right side of a pair, and the more-frequently accessed ISO control to the left side of a pair.

LCD Panel Readouts

The top panel of the EOS 40D (see Figure 2.13) contains a monochrome LCD readout that displays status information about most of the shooting settings. All of the information segments available are shown in Figure 2.14. I've color-coded

Shutter Speed/AF Point Shots Remaining/Shots

Selection/CF Card Remaining-WB

Warmings/Error Automatic White Bracketing/Self-Timer

Codes/Busy/Cleaning Image Exposure Balance Countdown/Bulb

Sensor/Flash Recycling Bracketing Correction Aperture Exposure Time

Mode

Figure 2.14

White Balance Presets ' Image Size/Quality '

Flash Exposure • Compensation Indicator

Exposure Level/ ' Exposure Compensation Amount/ Flash Exposure Compensation Amount/ AEB Range/CF Card Writing Status

Mode

Figure 2.14

White Balance Presets ' Image Size/Quality '

Flash Exposure • Compensation Indicator

Exposure Level/ ' Exposure Compensation Amount/ Flash Exposure Compensation Amount/ AEB Range/CF Card Writing Status

Battery Monochrome Beepe Level Mode Indicator

Custom Single Shooting/HS Continuous Function Shooting/LS Continuous Shooting/Self-Timer the display to make it easier to differentiate them; the information does not appear in color on the actual 40D. Many of the information items are mutually exclusive (that is, in the White Balance area at upper left, only one of the possible settings illustrated will appear).

Some of the items on the status LCD also appear in the viewfinder, such as the shutter speed and aperture (pictured at top in blue in the figure), and the exposure level (in yellow at the bottom).

Lens Components

The typical lens, like the one shown in Figures 2.15 and 2.16, has seven or eight common features:

■ Filter thread. Lenses have a thread on the front for attaching filters and other add-ons. Some also use this thread for attaching a lens hood (you screw on the filter first, and then attach the hood to the screw thread on the front of the filter).

Filter thread

Lens hood bayonet mount

Zoom scale Focus ring Focus distance

Autofocus/Manual switch

Figure 2.15

Zoom scale Focus ring Focus distance

Autofocus/Manual switch

Figure 2.16

■ Lens hood bayonet. This is used to mount the lens hood for lenses that don't use screw-mount hoods (the majority).

■ Zoom ring. Turn this ring to change the zoom setting.

■ Zoom scale. These markings on the lens show the current focal length selected.

■ Focus ring. This is the ring you turn when you manually focus the lens.

■ Distance scale. This is a readout that rotates in unison with the lens' focus mechanism to show the distance at which the lens has been focused. It's a useful indicator for double-checking autofocus, roughly evaluating depth-of-field, and for setting manual focus guesstimates.

■ Autofocus/Manual switch. Allows you to change from automatic focus to manual focus.

■ Image stabilization switch (not shown). Lenses with IS include a separate switch for adjusting the stabilization feature.

Figure 2.16

Electrical Contacts

Lens Mount Bayonet

Electrical Contacts

Lens Mount Bayonet

Looking Inside the Viewfinder

Much of the important shooting status information is shown inside the viewfinder of the EOS 40D. As with the status LCD up on top, not all of this information will be shown at any one time. Figure 2.17 shows what you can expect to see. These readouts include:

■ Spot metering reference circle. Shows the circle that delineates the metered area when Spot Metering is activated.

■ Autofocus zones. Shows the nine areas used by the 40D to focus. The camera can select the appropriate focus zone for you, or you can manually select one or all of the zones, as described in Chapter 4.

Autoexposure Lock/ Flash

Automatic Exposure Exposure Spot meter Autofocus Bracketing in Progress Compensation circle Points

Autoexposure Lock/ Flash

Automatic Exposure Exposure Spot meter Autofocus Bracketing in Progress Compensation circle Points

Figure 2.17

✓ Shutter speed f Aperture ? ISO Sensitivity t Monochrome Mode f WB Correction/ WB Bracketing

«* Maximum Burst

Focus Confirmation Light

Flash Ready/ Improper FE Lock

Hi-Speed FP Flash Sync/Flash Exposure Lock/Flash Exposure Bracketing in Process

Other messages: Flash Exposure Lock/ Busy/CF Card Full/ CF Card Error/ No CF Card

Exposure Level Indicator/Exposure Compensation Amount/Flash

Exposure Compensation Amount/AEB Range/Red-Eye Reduction Lamp-on Indicator

Flash Ready/ Improper FE Lock

Hi-Speed FP Flash Sync/Flash Exposure Lock/Flash Exposure Bracketing in Process

Other messages: Flash Exposure Lock/ Busy/CF Card Full/ CF Card Error/ No CF Card

Figure 2.17

✓ Shutter speed f Aperture ? ISO Sensitivity t Monochrome Mode f WB Correction/ WB Bracketing

«* Maximum Burst

Focus Confirmation Light

Exposure Level Indicator/Exposure Compensation Amount/Flash

Exposure Compensation Amount/AEB Range/Red-Eye Reduction Lamp-on Indicator

■ Auto exposure lock. Shows that exposure has been locked. This icon also appears when an automatic exposure bracketing sequence is in process.

■ Flash ready indicator. This icon appears when the flash is fully charged. It also shows when the flash exposure lock has been applied for an inappropriate exposure value.

■ Flash status indicator. Appears along with the flash ready indicator: the H is shown when high speed (focal plane) flash sync is being used. The * appears when flash exposure lock or a flash exposure bracketing sequence is underway.

■ Flash exposure compensation. Appears when flash EV changes have been made.

■ Shutter speed/aperture readouts. Most of the time, these readouts show the current shutter speed and aperture. This pair can also warn you of Compact Flash card conditions (full, error, or missing), ISO speed, flash exposure lock, and a buSY indicator when the camera is busy doing other things (including flash recycling).

■ Exposure level indicator. This scale shows the current exposure level, with the bottom indicator centered when the exposure is correct as metered. The indicator may also move to the left or right to indicate under- or overexposure (respectively). The scale is also used to show the amount of EV and flash EV adjustments, the number of stops covered by the current automatic exposure bracketing range, and is used as a red-eye reduction lamp indicator.

■ ISO Sensitivity. New to the EOS 40D is this useful indicator that shows the current ISO setting value. Those who have accidentally taken dozens of shots under bright sunlight at ISO 1600 because they forgot to change the setting back after some indoor shooting will treasure this addition.

■ B/W indicator. Illuminates when the Monochrome Picture Style is being used. There's no way to restore color when you're shooting JPEGs without RAW, so this indicator is another valuable warning.

■ White balance correction. Shows that white balance has been tweaked.

■ Maximum burst available. Changes to a number to indicate the number of frames that can be taken in Continuous mode using the current settings.

■ Focus confirmation. This green dot appears when the subject covered by the active autofocus zone is in sharp focus.

Underneath Your EOS 40D

There's not a lot going on with the bottom panel of your EOS 40D. You'll find a tripod socket, which secures the camera to a tripod, and is also used to lock on the optional BG-E2N battery grip, which provides more juice to run your camera to take more exposures with a single charge. It also adds a vertically oriented shutter release, Main Dial, AE lock/FE lock, and AF point selection controls for easier vertical shooting. There's a terminal connector under a rubber cover to provide a connection between the 40D and accessories that fasten to the underside.

Figure 2.18

Canon PS126

FOR HOME Oft OFFICE USE '

Canon PS126

FOR HOME Oft OFFICE USE '

Battery Compartment Latch

Figure 2.18

Extension System Terminal Cover

Tripod Socket

Battery Compartment Latch

To mount the grip, slide the battery door latch to open at an angle and lightly pull to remove it. That will let you remove the battery door. Then slide the grip into the battery cavity, aligning the pin on the grip with the small hole on the other side of the tripod socket. Tighten the grip's tripod socket screw to lock the grip onto the bottom of your 40D. Figure 2.18 shows the underside view of the camera, and Figure 2.19 offers a close-up look at the accessory terminal connection.

Figure 2.19

Extension System Terminal Connection

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Digital Camera and Digital Photography

Digital Camera and Digital Photography

Compared to film cameras, digital cameras are easy to use, fun and extremely versatile. Every day there’s more features being designed. Whether you have the cheapest model or a high end model, digital cameras can do an endless number of things. Let’s look at how to get the most out of your digital camera.

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