Canon 40d Connector

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Canon EOS 40D Roadmap

The Canon EOS 40D has an amazing number of buttons and dials and knobs— and that's actually a good thing. While it might take you some time to learn the position and function of each of these controls, once you've mastered them this camera is remarkably easy to use. That's because dedicated buttons with only one or two functions each are much faster to access than the alternative—a maze of menus that must be navigated every time you want to use a feature.

For example, if you need to change the ISO setting on your 40D, would you rather press the ISO button and spin the Main Dial until the desired value appears on the LCD—or would you prefer tapping a menu button, using cursor keys to locate the ISO setting submenu, pressing a button to select the ISO menu, navigating to the ISO value you want, and then pressing an OK button to confirm your choice? Yet, that's the procedure mandated by countless point-and-shoot digital cameras and more than a few digital SLRs. The Canon dedicated button approach (also used by other digital SLR vendors) is a much better design.

Of course, to learn the function and application of all these controls, what you really need is a street-level roadmap that shows where everything is, and how it's used. But what Canon gives you is a world globe with an overall view and many cross-references to the pages that will tell you what you really need to know. Check out the Nomenclature pages in the manual, which offer two tiny line drawings of the camera body that show front, back, two sides, and the top and bottom of the 40D. There are more than 50 callouts pointing to various buttons and dials. If you can find the control you want in this cramped layout, you'll still need to flip back and forth among multiple pages (individual buttons can have as many as five different cross references!) to locate the information. Most other third-party books follow this format, featuring black-and-white photos of front, back, and top views, and many labels.

I'm out to atone for those deficiencies. In this chapter, I'm going to provide a street-level roadmap, rather than a satellite view, using many different views and lots of explanation accompanying each zone of the camera, so that by the time you finish this chapter, you'll have a basic understanding of every control and what it does. I'm not going to delve into menu functions here—you'll find a discussion of your setup, shooting, and playback menu options in Chapter 3. Everything here is devoted to the button pusher and dial twirler in you.

Canon EOS 40D: Full Frontal_

The front of the 40D (see Figure 2.1) is the face seen by your victims as you snap away. For the photographer, though, the front is the surface your fingers curl around as you hold the camera, and there are really only three buttons to press, all within easy reach of the fingers of your left hand, plus the shutter button and Main Dial, which are on the top/front of the handgrip. There are additional controls on the lens itself. You'll need to look at several different views to see everything.

Figure 2.2 shows a three-quarters view of the left side of the EOS 40D (when viewed from the front). You can see the flash hot shoe on top and the door for the Compact Flash card at the left edge. The other components you need to know about are as follows:

■ Shutter button. Angled on top of the handgrip is the shutter release button. Press this button down halfway to lock exposure and focus (in One Shot mode and AI Focus with non-moving subjects).

■ Main Dial. This dial is used to change shooting settings. When settings are available in pairs (such as shutter speed/aperture), this dial will be used to make one type of setting, such as shutter speed, while the Quick Control Dial (on the back of the camera) will be used to make the other, such as aperture setting.

■ Red-Eye reduction/self-timer lamp. This LED provides a blip of light shortly before a flash exposure to cause the subjects' pupils to close down, reducing the effect of red-eye reflections off their retinas. When using the self-timer, this lamp also flashes to mark the countdown until the photo is taken.

■ DC power cord cover. (Not visible.) This cover, on the inside edge of the handgrip, opens to allow the DC power cable to connect to the 40D.

Polaroidaesthetic Stickers

Figure 2.2

Main Dial

Shutter Release

Compact Flash Door Handgrip

DC power cord cover

Red Eye Reduction

Lamp/Self-Timer Lamp \

Red Eye Reduction

Lamp/Self-Timer Lamp \

Figure 2.2

Main Dial

Shutter Release

Compact Flash Door Handgrip

Flash Door

■ Handgrip. This provides a comfortable handhold, and also contains the 40D's battery.

■ Compact Flash card slot. Slide the door over this slot towards the back of the camera to provide access to the Compact Flash memory card.

You'll find more controls on the other side of the 40D, shown in Figure 2.3. In the illustration, you can see the Mode Dial on top, and the rubber cover on the side that protects the camera's USB, TV, external flash, and remote control ports.

Figure 2.3

ide Dial Flash button

External connector terminal cover

Lens release button "" Depth-of-fieldpreview

The main buttons shown include:

■ Flash button. This button releases the built-in flash so it can flip up (see Figure 2.4) and starts the charging process. If you decide you do not want to use the flash, you can turn it off by pressing the flash head back down.

■ Lens Release button. Press and hold this button to unlock the lens so you can rotate the lens to remove it from the camera.

■ Depth-of-Field Preview button. This button, adjacent to the lens mount, stops down the lens to the taking aperture so you can see in the viewfinder how much of the image is in focus. The view grows dimmer as the aperture is reduced.

■ Lens switches. Canon autofocus lenses have a switch to allow changing between automatic focus and manual focus, and, in the case of IS lenses, another switch to turn image stabilization on and off.

External connector terminal cover

Lens release button "" Depth-of-fieldpreview

Image stabilization switch

Image stabilization switch

Pressing the Flash button (which has an arrow/lightning bolt symbol) pops up the built-in flash unit and starts the charging process.

Pressing the Flash button (which has an arrow/lightning bolt symbol) pops up the built-in flash unit and starts the charging process.

Image Stabilization Symbol Canon

The main feature on this side of the EOS 40D is a rubber cover (see Figure 2.5) that protects the four connector ports underneath from dust and moisture.

Figure 2.5

Figure 2.5

Canon Aircraft Connector Cover
External connector terminal cover

The four connectors, shown in Figure 2.6, are as follows:

■ USB port. Plug in the USB cable furnished with your EOS 40D and connect the other end to a USB port in your computer to transfer photos.

■ Video port. You can link this connector with a television to view your photos on a large screen.

■ PC terminal. This connector is for a non-dedicated electronic flash unit, including studio flash.

■ Remote control terminal. You can plug various Canon remote release switches, timers, and wireless controllers into this connector.

Figure 2.6

Canon 40d Connectors

Remote Control terminal

USB port

PC connector

Remote Control terminal

USB port

The Canon EOS 40D's Business End

The back panel of the EOS 40D (see Figure 2.7) bristles with more than a dozen different controls, buttons, and knobs. That might seem like a lot of controls to learn, but you'll find, as I noted earlier, that it's a lot easier to press a dedicated button and spin a dial than to jump to a menu every time you want to change a setting.

You can see the controls clustered on the left side of the 40D in Figure 2.8. The key buttons and components and their functions are as follows:

■ Viewfinder eyepiece. You can frame your composition by peering into the viewfinder. It's surrounded by a soft rubber frame that seals out extraneous light when pressing your eye tightly up to the viewfinder, and it also protects your eyeglass lenses (if worn) from scratching. It can be removed and replaced by the cap attached to your neck strap when you use the camera on a tripod, to ensure that light coming from the back of the camera doesn't venture inside and possibly affect the exposure reading.

■ Print/Share button. Used to print and share images when the 40D is connected to a computer with the USB cable.

■ Menu button. Summons/exits the menu displayed on the rear LCD of the 40D. When you're working with submenus, this button also serves to exit a submenu and return to the main menu.

■ Playback button. Displays the last picture taken. Thereafter, you can move back and forth among the available images by rotating the Quick Control Dial, to advance or reverse one image at a time, or the Main Dial, to jump forward or back using the jump method selected with the Jump button (described below). To quit playback, press this button again. The 40D also

Print/Share button »

Menu button

Erase button

Playback button

Print/Share button »

Menu button

Erase button

Playback button

Jump button

Info/Trim Orientation button

Picture Styles button

Jump button

Info/Trim Orientation button

Picture Styles button exits Playback mode automatically when you press the shutter button (so you'll never be prevented from taking a picture on the spur of the moment because you happened to be viewing an image).

■ Erase button. Press to erase the image shown on the LCD. A menu will pop up displaying Cancel and Erase choices. Rotate the Main Dial or the Quick Control Dial to select one of these actions, then press the Set button to activate your choice.

■ Jump button. Specifies the leaps that skip a specified number of images during playback of the shots you've already taken. Jumps can be either 1 image, 10 images, 100 images, jump by date, or jump by screen (that is, by screens of thumbnails when using index mode). Once the Jump button is pressed, rotate the Quick Control Dial to select the jumping method, and press the

Figure 2.9

Set button to confirm your choice. Thereafter, the Main Dial can be used to jump using your chosen method. This button is also used to leap to the first item in a menu and to display various types of image information in the single image display mode.

■ Info. button. When pressed repeatedly, changes the amount of picture information displayed. In shooting mode, the color LCD changes from no information, to detailed information (see Figure 2.9), to a shooting information display that provides the same data as the top panel monochrome LCD (see Figure 2.10). The latter mode is especially useful when the 40D is mounted on a tripod and the top panel isn't readily visible. In playback mode, pressing the Info. button cycles among basic displays of the image; a detailed display with a thumbnail of the image, shooting parameters, and a brightness histogram; and a display with less detail but with separate histograms for brightness, red, green, and blue channels. When setting Picture Styles, the Info. button is used to select a highlighted Picture Style for modification. In Live View mode, the Info. button adjusts the amount of information overlaid on the live image that appears on the LCD screen. When trimming an image, the Info. button selects the orientation.

■ Picture Styles. This button pops up the Picture Styles menu on the LCD, so you can select a given style or modify an existing style. You'll find more about Picture Styles in Chapter 3.

Picture Style Standard

Detail ©0,C 0,e°o 0,® 0 Color space sRGB WB SHIFT/BKT 0,0/±0

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Responses

  • james
    What is the purpose of the canon 40d video out connector?
    3 years ago
  • eberardo
    What usb connectoris on eos 40d?
    9 months ago

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