Expert Shield For Canon Eos 40d

Shooting Your First Canon EOS 40D Picture

If I were a betting person, I'd be willing to wager that you've already taken—at least—a few hundred shots with your new Canon EOS 40D. As valuable as a book like this one is, nobody can suppress their excitement long enough to read the instructions before initiating play with a new toy. My first photo with this camera was a snapshot of the owner of the photo store where I bought my 40D. As a long-time Canon owner, I purchased just the 40D body (sans lens), but I remembered to take a favorite lens and a Compact Flash card with me when I picked up the camera. Because the 40D had just been introduced, there was enough of a maintenance charge in the fresh-off-the-boat battery to allow capturing a few images on the spot, even before the ink on my check was dry.

That's how easy the EOS 40D is to set up and use: it's not a point-and-shoot camera, but if you have some experience with film or digital SLRs (especially if you have worked with the EOS 30D or 20D), you can assemble all the pieces, flip the power switch, remove the lens cap, and then point—and shoot. And, even if you were not already familiar with this camera, you were able to figure out what that big switch on the back labeled OFF and ON does, and, probably, aligned the big 'ole dial on the top surface with one of the icons representing things like a person (portrait), flower (close-up), mountain scene (landscape), or runner (sports activity). (These are the Basic or "scene" modes.) So, this first chapter is not likely to be your first exposure to using the Canon EOS 40D.

Still, this is my opportunity to review the setup procedures for the camera for those among you who are already veteran users, and to help ease the more timid (and those who have never worked with a digital SLR before) into the basic pre-flight checklist that needs to be completed before you really spread your wings and take off. For the uninitiated, the EOS 40D does have lots of dials and buttons and settings that might not make sense at first, but will surely become second nature after you've had a chance to use the camera for awhile.

But don't fret about wading through a manual to find out what you must know to take those first few tentative snaps. I'm going to help you hit the ground running with this chapter, which will help you set up your camera and begin shooting in minutes. You won't find a lot of detail in this chapter. Indeed, I'm going to tell you just what you absolutely must understand, accompanied by some interesting tidbits that will help you become acclimated. I'll go into more depth and even repeat some of what I explain here in later chapters, so you don't have to memorize everything you see. Just relax, follow a few easy steps, and then go out and begin taking your best shots—ever.

First Things First

The Canon EOS 40D comes in an impressive gray-and-red box filled with stuff, including connecting cords, booklets, CDs, and lots of paperwork. The most important components are the camera and lens (if you purchased your 40D with a lens), battery, battery charger, and, if you're the nervous type, the neck strap. You'll also need a Compact Flash memory card, as one is not included. If you purchased your EOS 40D from a camera shop, as I did, the store personnel probably attached the neck strap for you, ran through some basic operational advice that you've already forgotten, tried to sell you another Compact Flash card, and then, after they'd given you all the help you could absorb, sent you on your way with a handshake.

Perhaps you purchased your 40D from one of those mass merchandisers that also sell washing machines and vacuum cleaners. In that case, you might have been sent on your way with only the handshake, or, maybe, not even that if you resisted the hard-sell efforts to sell you an extended warranty. You save a few bucks, but don't get the personal service a professional photo retailer provides. It's your choice. There's a third alternative, of course. You might have purchased your camera from a mail order or Internet source, and your 40D arrived in a big brown (or purple/red or yellow/red) truck. Your only interaction when you took possession of your camera was to scrawl your signature on an electronic clipboard.

In all three cases, the first thing to do is to carefully unpack the camera and double-check the contents with the checklist on one end of the box, helpfully designated with a CONTENTS heading. At a minimum, the box should include a Digital Camera EOS 40D, Wide Strap EW-100DGR, Battery Charger CG-580, Battery Pack BP-511A, Interface Cable IFC-200U, Video Cable VC-100, and a software CD-ROM. It's possible that the camera was accompanied by a lens, as well, and that the contents I've listed above will vary slightly depending on when and where you bought the camera.

While this level of setup detail may seem as superfluous as the instructions on a bottle of shampoo, checking the contents first is always a good idea. No matter who sells a camera, it's common to open boxes, use a particular camera for a demonstration, and then repack the box without replacing all the pieces and parts afterwards. Someone might actually have helpfully checked out your camera on your behalf—and then mispacked the box. It's better to know now that something is missing so you can seek redress immediately, rather than discover two months from now that the video cable you thought you'd never use (but now must have) was never in the box.

Initial Setup

The initial setup of your Canon EOS 40D is fast and easy. Basically, you just need to charge the battery, attach a lens, and insert a Compact Flash card. I'll address each of these steps separately, but if you already feel you can manage these setup tasks without further instructions, feel free to skip this section entirely. You should at least skim its contents, however, because I'm going to list a few options that you might not be aware of.

Battery Included

Your Canon EOS 40D is a sophisticated hunk of machinery and electronics, but it needs a charged battery to function, so rejuvenating the BP-511A lithium-ion battery pack furnished with the camera should be your first step. A fully charged power source should be good for approximately 1,100 shots, based on standard tests defined by the Camera & Imaging Products Association (CIPA) document DC-002. If half your pictures use the built-in flash, you can expect about 800 shots before it's time for a recharge.

All rechargeable batteries undergo some degree of self-discharge just sitting idle in the camera or in the original packaging. Lithium-ion power packs of this type typically lose a few percent of their charge every day, even when the camera isn't turned on. The small amount of juice used to provide the "skeleton" outline on

A BATTERY AND A SPARE

My experience is that the CIPA figures are often a little optimistic, so it's probably a good idea to have a spare battery on hand. In addition to the BP-511A, the 40D will also work with Canon BP-511, BP-512, and BP-514 battery packs if you have one handy. The chief difference among them is that the BP-511 and BP-512 provide 1,100 mAh of juice, while the BP-511A and BP-514 furnish 1,390 mAh— more than 25 percent more power.

I always recommend purchasing Canon brand batteries (for about $50) over less-expensive third-party packs, even though the $30 substitute batteries may offer more capacity (some top 1,500 mAh) at a lower price. My reasoning is that it doesn't make sense to save $20 on a component for a $1,000-plus camera, especially since batteries (from Canon as well as other sources) have been known to fail in potentially harmful ways. Canon, at least, will stand behind its products, issue a recall if necessary, and supply a replacement if a Canon-brand battery is truly defective. A third-party battery supplier that sells under a half-dozen or more different product labels and brands may not even have an easy way to get the word out that a recall has been issued.

If your pictures are important to you, always have at least one spare battery available, and make sure it is an authentic Canon product.

the top panel monochrome LCD when the 40D is turned off isn't the culprit; Li-ion cells lose their power through a chemical reaction that continues when the camera is switched off. So, it's very likely that the battery purchased with your camera is at least partially pooped out, so you'll want to revive it before going out for some serious shooting.

Power Options

Several battery chargers are available for the Canon EOS 40D. The compact CG-580, shown in Figure 1.1, is furnished with the camera, and so is the charger that most 40D owners end up using. Purchasing one of the optional charging devices offers more than some additional features: You gain a spare that can keep your camera running until you can replace your primary power rejuvenator. Here's a list of your power options:

■ CG-580: The standard charger for the 40D (and also compatible with earlier cameras that use the same batteries), this one is the most convenient, because of its compact size and built-in wall plug prongs that connect directly into your power strip or wall socket and requires no cord.

■ CB-5L: This is similar to the CG-580, and also charges a single battery, but requires a cord. That can be advantageous in certain situations. For example, if your power outlet is behind a desk or in some other semi-inaccessible location, the cord can be plugged in and routed so the charger itself sits on your desk or another more convenient spot. The cord itself is a standard one that works with many different chargers and devices (including the power supply for my laptop), so I purchased several of them and leave them plugged into the wall in various locations. I can connect my 40D's charger, my laptop computer's charger, and several other electronic components to one of these cords without needing to crawl around behind the furniture. The cord itself draws no power when it's not plugged into a charger.

■ Compact Power Adapter CA-PS400: This handy device can charge a pair of batteries at once. You'll want this charger if you are using the 40D's BG-E2N battery-vertical grip (which holds two power packs) or if you do a lot of shooting at any given time and run through your batteries quickly.

■ Dual Battery Charger CG-570: This is another charger that can juice up two 500-series batteries at once when connected to either the Car Battery Cable CB-570 (plug into your vehicle's lighter or accessory socket) or the Compact Power Adapter CA-570 (connect to an AC power source). The vehicle battery option allows you to keep shooting when in remote locations that lack AC power.

■ Battery Grip BG-E2N: This accessory holds two batteries (or six AA cells with the BGM-E2 battery holder). You can potentially increase your shooting capacity to 1,900-2,200 shots (1,400-1,600 with flash), while adding an additional shutter release, main dial, AE lock/FE lock, and AF point selection controls for vertically oriented shooting.

■ AC Adapter Kit ACK-E2: This device allows you to operate your EOS 40D directly from AC power, with no battery required. Studio photographers need this capability because they often snap off hundreds of pictures for hours on end and want constant, reliable power. The camera is probably plugged into a flash sync cord (or radio device), and the studio flash are plugged into power packs or AC power, so the extra tether to this adapter is no big deal in that environment. You also might want to use the AC adapter when viewing images on a TV connected to your 40D, or when shooting remote or time-lapse photos.

Charging the Battery

When the battery is inserted into the CG-580 charger properly (it's impossible to insert it incorrectly), a Charge light begins flashing. It flashes on and off until the battery reaches a 50 percent charge, then blinks in two-flash cycles between 5075 percent charged, and in a three-flash sequence until the battery is 90 percent charged, usually within about 90 minutes. You should allow the charger to continue for about 60 minutes more, until the status lamp glows steadily, to ensure a full charge. When the battery is charged, flip the lever on the bottom of the camera and slide the battery in. (See Figure 1.2.)

Figure 1.1 The flashing status light indicates that the battery is being charged.

Figure 1.2 Insert the battery in the camera; it only fits one way.

Final Steps

Your Canon EOS 40D is almost ready to fire up and shoot. You'll need to select and mount a lens, adjust the viewfinder for your vision, and insert a Compact Flash card. Each of these steps is easy, and if you've used an EOS 30D or 20D (or one of the Digital Rebels), you already know exactly what to do. I'm going to provide a little extra detail for those of you who are new to the Canon or digital SLR worlds.

Mounting the Lens

As you'll see, my recommended lens mounting procedure emphasizes protecting your equipment from accidental damage, and minimizing the intrusion of dust. If your 40D has no lens attached, select the lens you want to use and loosen (but do not remove) the rear lens cap. I generally place the lens I am planning to mount vertically in a slot in my camera bag, where it's protected from mishaps, but ready to pick up quickly. By loosening the rear lens cap, you'll be able to lift it off the back of the lens at the last instant, so the rear element of the lens is covered until then.

After that, remove the body cap by pressing the release button next to the lens mount, and rotating the cap towards the shutter release button. You should always mount the body cap when there is no lens on the camera, because it helps keep dust out of the interior of the camera, where it can settle on the mirror, focusing screen, the interior mirror box, and potentially find its way past the shutter onto the sensor. (While the 40D's sensor cleaning mechanism works fine, the less dust it has to contend with, the better.) The body cap also protects the vulnerable mirror from damage caused by intruding objects (including your fingers, if you're not cautious).

Once the body cap has been removed, remove the rear lens cap from the lens, set it aside, and then mount the lens on the camera by matching the alignment indicator on the lens barrel (red for EF lenses and white for EF-S lenses) with the red or white dot on the camera's lens mount. (See Figure 1.3.) Rotate the lens toward the shutter release until it seats securely. (You can find out more about the difference between EF and EF-S lenses in Chapter 6.) Set the focus mode switch on the

Figure 1.3

Match the white dot on EF-S lenses with the white dot on the camera mount to properly align the lens with the bayonet mount. For EF lenses, use the red dots.

Figure 1.3

Match the white dot on EF-S lenses with the white dot on the camera mount to properly align the lens with the bayonet mount. For EF lenses, use the red dots.

lens to AF (autofocus). If the lens hood is bayoneted on the lens in the reversed position (which makes the lens/hood combination more compact for transport), twist it off and remount with the "petals" facing outward. (See Figure 1.4.) A lens hood protects the front of the lens from accidental bumps, and reduces flare caused by extraneous light arriving at the front element of the lens from outside the picture area.

Figure 1.4

A lens hood protects the lens from extraneous light and accidental bumps.

Figure 1.4

A lens hood protects the lens from extraneous light and accidental bumps.

Adjusting Diopter Correction

Those of us with less than perfect eyesight can often benefit from a little optical correction in the viewfinder. Your contact lenses or glasses may provide all the correction you need, but if you are a glasses wearer and want to use the EOS 40D without your glasses, you can take advantage of the camera's built in diopter adjustment, which can be varied from —3 to +1 correction. Press the shutter release halfway to illuminate the indicators in the viewfinder, then rotate the diopter adjustment wheel next to the viewfinder (see Figure 1.5) while looking through the viewfinder until the indicators appear sharp.

Figure 1.5

Viewfinder diopter correction from —3 to + 1 can be dialed in.

Diopter adjustment knob

Figure 1.5

Viewfinder diopter correction from —3 to + 1 can be dialed in.

Diopter adjustment knob

If the available correction is insufficient, Canon offers 10 different Dioptric Adjustment Lens Series E correction lenses for the viewfinder window. If more than one person uses your 40D, and each requires a different diopter setting, you can save a little time by noting the number of clicks and direction (clockwise to increase the diopter power; counterclockwise to decrease the diopter value) required to change from one user to the other. There are 18 detents in all.

Inserting a Compact Flash Card

You can't take photos without a Compact Flash card inserted in your EOS 40D (although there is a Shoot w/o Card entry in Shooting Menu 1 that enables/disables shutter release functions when a memory card is absent—learn about that in Chapter 3). So, your final step will be to insert a Compact Flash card. Slide the door on the right side of the body toward the back of the camera to release the cover, and then open it. (You should only remove the memory card when the camera is switched off, but the 40D will remind you if the door is opened while the camera is still writing photos to the Compact Flash card.)

Insert the memory card with the label facing the back of the camera, as shown in Figure 1.6, oriented so the edge with the double row of tiny holes goes into the slot first. Close the door, and your preflight checklist is done! (I'm going to assume you remember to remove the lens cap when you're ready to take a picture!) When you want to remove the memory card later, press the gray button (shown at the bottom of Figure 1.7) to make the Compact Flash card pop out.

Figure 1.6 The Compact Flash card is inserted with the Figure 1.7 To remove a Compact Flash card, press label facing the back of the camera. the gray button at the bottom of the slot to pop the card out of the camera.

Figure 1.6 The Compact Flash card is inserted with the Figure 1.7 To remove a Compact Flash card, press label facing the back of the camera. the gray button at the bottom of the slot to pop the card out of the camera.

HOW MANY SHOTS? GUESS!

You know you have a great camera when the counter that keeps track of the number of shots remaining is its most annoying defect. What's the deal? The counter tops out at a measly 999 shots, which is a ridiculously low number given the capacity of modern Compact Flash cards. If you use a 4GB or 8GB card, it's almost inevitable that the counter will indicate no more than 999 shots remaining if you're shooting JPEG Fine or JPEG Standard—even though you may actually have much more capacity than that remaining.

For example, an 8GB card can hold about 1,450 JPEG Fine shots in full resolution (Large) format, but the counter shows just 999 pictures remaining (as it also will for full resolution JPEG Standard). If you're using a "medium"-sized 4GB card, the counter overflows at 999 exposures when you shoot at JPEG Standard (the actual capacity is about 1,468 exposures). Even puny 2GB cards can cause the counter to falter if you elect to use Medium or Small resolution settings. Ironically, you might have been using JPEG rather than RAW or RAW+JPEG in order to squeeze more images onto your memory card—but the 40D won't tell you just how many more pictures remain, until the count dips below 999. Some other camera brands insert a K (for kilo, or thousands) in the counter (as in 1.4K) to show large numbers of exposures remaining.

There's not much excuse for this, because 8GB and 4GB cards have become so prevalent. The silver lining is that if you shoot RAW or RAW+JPEG, rather than JPEG alone, the counter does its job with any common card capacity (a 4GB card displays 252 shots remaining; an 8GB card bumps the counter up to only 502). While I expect that 16GB Compact Flash cards will become relatively cheap during the life of this book, it's hard to visualize a situation in which an EOS 40D owner will actually need to fit 3,000 JPEG Fine pictures onto a single card.

Selecting a Shooting Mode

You can choose a shooting method from the Mode Dial located on the top left edge of the Canon EOS 40D. There are seven Basic Zone shooting modes, in which the camera makes virtually all the decisions for you (except when to press the shutter), and five Creative Zone modes, which allow you to provide input over the exposure and settings the camera uses. There are also three Camera User Settings that can be used to store specific groups of camera settings, which you can then recall quickly by spinning the Mode Dial to C1, C2, or C3. You'll find a complete description of both Basic Zone and Creative Zone modes as well as Camera User Settings in Chapter 4.

Turn your camera on by flipping the power switch to ON, or to the mark above the ON indicator, which is also "on" but which activates the Quick Control Dial above and to the right of the power switch, as shown in Figure 1.8. (You'll want the Quick Control Dial active in virtually all situations.) Next, you need to select which shooting mode to use. If you're very new to digital photography, you might want to set the camera to Auto (the green frame on the Mode Dial) or P (Program mode) and start snapping away. Either mode will make all the appropriate settings for you for many shooting situations. If you have a specific type of picture you want to shoot, you can try out one of the other Basic Zone modes indicated on the Mode Dial with appropriate icons and shown in Figure 1.9:

■ Auto. In this mode, the 40D makes all the exposure decisions for you, and will pop up the flash if necessary under low light conditions.

■ Portrait. Use this mode when you're taking a portrait of a subject standing relatively close to the camera and want to de-emphasize the background, maximize sharpness, and produce flattering skin tones.

■ Landscape. Select this mode when you want extra sharpness and rich colors of distant scenes.

Figure 1.8

Rotate the power switch all the way counterclockwise to activate the Quick Control Dial.

Quick Control Dial

Activate Quick Control Dial

Canon T6i Exposure Mode

Figure 1.9

The Mode Dial includes both Basic Zone and Creative Zone settings.

Basic Zone Modes

Creative ZoneModes

Figure 1.9

The Mode Dial includes both Basic Zone and Creative Zone settings.

Basic Zone Modes

Creative ZoneModes

■ Close Up. This mode is helpful when you are shooting close-up pictures of a subject from about one foot away or less.

■ Sports. Use this mode to freeze fast-moving subjects.

■ Night Portrait. Choose this mode when you want to illuminate a subject in the foreground with flash, but still allow the background to be exposed properly by the available light. Be prepared to use a tripod or an image stabilized (IS) lens to reduce the effects of camera shake. (You'll find more about IS and camera shake in Chapter 6.)

■ Flash Off. This is the mode to use in museums and other locations where flash is forbidden or inappropriate. It otherwise operates exactly like the Auto setting but disables the pop-up internal flash unit.

If you have more photographic experience, you might want to opt for one of the Creative Zone modes, also shown in Figure 1.9. These, too, are described in more detail in Chapter 4. These modes all let you apply a little more creativity to your camera's settings. These modes are indicated on the Mode Dial by letters A-DEP, M, Av, Tv, and P:

■ A-DEP (Automatic depth-of-field). Choose this mode if you want to allow the 40D to select an f/stop that will maximize depth-of-field for the subjects in the frame as it adjusts focus and selects an appropriate shutter speed.

■ M (Manual). Select when you want full control over the shutter speed and lens opening, either for creative effects or because you are using a studio flash or other flash unit not compatible with the 40D's automatic flash metering.

■ Av (Aperture Priority). Choose when you want to use a particular lens opening, especially to control sharpness or how much of your image is in focus. The 40D will select the appropriate shutter speed for you. Av stands for aperture value.

■ Tv (Shutter Priority). This mode (Tv stands for time value) is useful when you want to use a particular shutter speed to stop action or produce creative blur effects. The 40D will select the appropriate f/stop for you.

■ P (Program). This mode allows the 40D to select the basic exposure settings, but you can still override the camera's choices to fine-tune your image.

Choosing a Metering Mode

You might want to select a particular metering mode for your first shots, although the default Evaluative Metering (which is set automatically when you choose a Basic Zone mode) is probably the best choice as you get to know your camera. To change metering modes, press the Metering Mode/WB button and spin the Main Dial to cycle among the choices shown in Figure 1.10:

■ Evaluative metering. The standard metering mode; the 40D attempts to intelligently classify your image and choose the best exposure based on readings from 35 different zones in the frame, with emphasis on the autofocus points.

■ Partial metering. Exposure is based on a central spot, roughly nine percent of the image area.

■ Spot metering. Exposure is calculated from a smaller central spot, about 3.8 percent of the image area.

■ Center-Weighted Averaging metering. The 40D meters the entire scene, but gives the most emphasis to the central area of the frame.

You'll find a detailed description of each of these modes in Chapter 4.

Figure 1.10

Metering modes (left to right Evaluative, Partial, Spot, Center-Weighted).

Figure 1.10

Metering modes (left to right Evaluative, Partial, Spot, Center-Weighted).

BUTTON, BUTTON

The top panel buttons each have two functions. To set the left function of each pair (that is AF with the AF-Drive button), hold the button and rotate the Main Dial. To set the right function of each pair, rotate the Quick Control Dial.

Choosing a Focus Mode

You can easily switch between automatic and manual focus by moving the AF/MF switch on the lens mounted on your camera. However, if you're using a Creative Zone shooting mode, you'll still need to choose an appropriate focus mode. (You can read more on selecting focus parameters in Chapter 5.) If you're using a Basic Zone mode, the focus method is set for you automatically.

To set the focus mode, press the AF-DRIVE button on the top panel of the camera (see Figure 1.11), and spin the Main Dial until the mode you want appears in the status LCD. The three choices are

■ One Shot. This mode, sometimes called Single Autofocus, locks in a focus point when the shutter button is pressed down halfway, and the focus confirmation light glows in the viewfinder. The focus will remain locked until you release the button or take the picture. If the camera is unable to achieve sharp focus, the focus confirmation light will blink. This mode is best when your subject is relatively motionless. Portrait, Night Portrait, and Landscape Basic Zone modes use this focus method exclusively.

■ AI Servo. This mode, sometimes called Continuous Autofocus, sets focus when you partially depress the shutter button, but continues to monitor the frame and refocuses if the camera or subject is moved. This is a useful mode for photographing sports and moving subjects. The Sports Basic Zone mode uses this focus method exclusively.

■ AI Focus. In this mode, the 40D switches between One Shot and AI Servo as appropriate. That is, it locks in a focus point when you partially depress the shutter button (One Shot mode), but switches automatically to AI Servo if the subject begins to move. This mode is handy when photographing a subject, such as a child at quiet play, which might move unexpectedly. The Flash Off Basic Zone mode uses this focus method.

Set Autofocus mode.

Autofocus Mode button

Figure 1.11

Main Dial

Set Autofocus mode.

Autofocus Mode button

Figure 1.11

Main Dial

Selecting a Focus Point

The Canon EOS 40D uses nine different focus points to calculate correct focus. In A-DEP, or any of the Basic Zone shooting modes, the focus point is selected automatically by the camera. In the other Creative Zone modes, you can allow the camera to select the focus point automatically, or you can specify which focus point should be used.

There are several methods to set the focus point manually. You can press the AF Point Selection button on the back of the camera, look through the viewfinder, and use the multi-controller button (to the right and below the viewfinder window) to move the focus point to the zone you want to use. For example, press the multi-controller straight up or down, and the top or bottom focus points are selected. To the left or right, and the side points are selected. Movements to the two o'clock, four o'clock, seven o'clock, or ten o'clock positions choose the in-between focus sensors. Press the multi-controller in, and the center focus point becomes active.

You can also choose a focus point by pressing the AF Point Selection button and then rotating the Main Dial. The focus point will cycle among the edge points counterclockwise (if you turn the Main Dial to the left) or clockwise (if you spin the Main Dial to the right), ending/starting with the center focus point/all nine focus points, as shown in Figure 1.12. The Quick Control Dial can also be used.

Figure 1.12

Select a focus point.

Other Settings

There are a few other settings you can make if you're feeling ambitious, but don't feel ashamed if you postpone using these features until you've racked up a little more experience with your EOS 40D.

Adjusting White Balance and ISO

If you like, you can custom tailor your white balance (color balance) and ISO sensitivity settings. To start out, it's best to set white balance (WB) to Auto, and ISO to ISO 100 or ISO 200 for daylight photos, and ISO 400 for pictures in dimmer light. You'll find complete recommendations for both these settings in Chapter 4. You can adjust either one now by pressing the Metering Mode-WB button (for white balance) and rotating the Quick Control Dial, or ISO-Flash Exposure Compensation button (for ISO sensitivity) and rotating the Main Dial until the setting you want appears on the status LCD. Both buttons are shown in Figure 1.11.

If you've been playing with your camera's settings, or your 40D has been used by someone else, you can restore the factory defaults by selecting Clear All Camera Settings from the Setup Menu 3, and/or Clear All Custom Func, from the Custom Functions main menu.

Using the Self-Timer

If you want to set a short delay before your picture is taken, you can use the self-timer. Press the AF-Drive button and rotate the Quick Control Dial until the self-timer icon (for a 10-second delay) or the self-timer icon accompanied by the numeral 2 (for a 2-second delay) appear on the status LCD. Canon supplies a rubber eyepiece cover, which attaches to your camera strap and can be slid over the eyepiece in place of the rubber eyecup. This prevents light from entering through the eyepiece, which can confuse the exposure meter. I've found that extraneous light is seldom a problem unless a bright light source is coming from directly behind the camera, in which case I use my hand to shield the viewfinder.

Press the shutter release to lock focus and start the timer. The self-timer lamp will blink and the beeper will sound (unless you've silenced it in the menus) until the final two seconds, when the lamp remains on and the beeper beeps more rapidly.

Reviewing the Images You've Taken

The Canon EOS 40D has a broad range of playback and image review options, and I'll cover them in more detail in Chapter 3. For now, you'll want to learn just the basics. Here is all you really need to know at this time, as shown in Figure

■ Press the Playback button (marked with a blue right-pointing triangle) to display the most recent image on the LCD.

■ Rotate the Quick Control Dial to review additional images. Turn it counterclockwise to review images from most recent to oldest, or clockwise to start with the first image on the Compact Flash card and cycle forward to the newest.

■ Use the Jump button to leap ahead 10 or 100 images.

■ Press the Info button repeatedly to cycle among overlays of basic image information, detailed shooting information, or no information at all.

■ Press the Magnify button repeatedly to zoom in on the image displayed; the Reduce Image button zooms back out. Press the Playback button to exit magnified display.

■ Use the multi-controller to scroll around within a magnified image.

Figure 1.13

Review your images.

" RReduce image/Show Thumbnails

* Magnify image " Scroll around within

Advance through images

Figure 1.13

Review your images.

" RReduce image/Show Thumbnails

* Magnify image " Scroll around within

Advance through images

You'll find information on viewing thumbnail indexes of images, jumping forward and backward 10 or 100 images at a time, automated playback, and other options in Chapter 3.

Transferring Photos to Your Computer

The final step in your picture-taking session will be to transfer the photos you've taken to your computer for printing, further review, or image editing. Your 40D allows you to print directly to PictBridge-compatible printers and to create print orders right in the camera, plus you can select which images to transfer to your computer. I'll outline those options in Chapter 3.

For now, you'll probably want to transfer your images either by using a cable transfer from the camera to the computer, or by removing the Compact Flash card from the 40D and transferring the images with a card reader. The latter option is usually the best, because it's usually much faster and doesn't deplete the battery of your camera. However, you can use a cable transfer when you have the cable and a computer, but no card reader (perhaps you're using the computer of a friend or colleague, or at an Internet café).

To transfer images from the camera to a Mac or PC computer using the USB cable:

1. Turn the camera off.

2. Pry back the rubber cover that protects the EOS 40D's USB port, and plug the USB cable furnished with the camera into the USB port. (See Figure 1.14.)

Figure 1.14

Images can be transferred to your computer using a USB cable.

Figure 1.14

Images can be transferred to your computer using a USB cable.

3. Connect the other end of the USB cable to a USB port on your computer.

4. Turn the camera on. Your installed software usually detects the camera and offers to transfer the pictures, or the camera appears on your desktop as a mass storage device, enabling you to drag and drop the files to your computer.

To transfer images from a Compact Flash card to the computer using a card reader, as shown in Figure 1.15:

1. Turn the camera off.

2. Slide open the Compact Flash card door, and press the gray button, which ejects the card.

3. Insert the Compact Flash card into your memory card reader. Your installed software detects the files on the card and offers to transfer them. The card can also appear as a mass storage device on your desktop, which you can open and then drag and drop the files to your computer.

Figure 1.15

A card reader is the fastest way to transfer photos.

Figure 1.15

A card reader is the fastest way to transfer photos.

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Digital Camera and Digital Photography

Digital Camera and Digital Photography

Compared to film cameras, digital cameras are easy to use, fun and extremely versatile. Every day there’s more features being designed. Whether you have the cheapest model or a high end model, digital cameras can do an endless number of things. Let’s look at how to get the most out of your digital camera.

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