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Figure 3.22

To view only the information screen you prefer, choose INFO. Button from the Set-up 1 menu.

Auto power off File numbering Auto rotate

INFO button

Continuous

Normal disp.

Format

Use this item to erase everything on your memory card and set up a fresh file system ready for use. When you select Format, you'll see a display like Figure 3.23, showing the capacity of the card, how much of that space is currently in use, and two choices at the bottom of the screen to Cancel or OK (proceed with the format). A blue-green bar appears on the screen to show the progress of the formatting step.

Format

Format CF card. All data will be lost!

Figure 3.23

You must confirm the format step before the camera will erase a memory card.

10.7MB used

7.74 GB

Cancel

LCD Brightness

Choose this menu option, the first on the second Set-up menu tab, and a thumbnail image with a grayscale strip appears on the LCD, as shown in Figure 3.24. Use the multi-controller or the Quick Control Dial to adjust the brightness to a comfortable viewing level. Brighter settings use more battery power, but can allow you to view an image on the LCD outdoors in bright sunlight. When you have the brightness you want, press the Set button to lock it in and return to the menu.

Date/Time

Use this option to set the date and time, which will be embedded in the image file along with exposure information and other data.

LCD brightness

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 # «—«—«—i—i—«—« eh ok

Adjust LCD brightness for easier viewing under varying ambient lighting conditions.

Language

Choose from 18 languages for menu display, rotating the Quick Command Dial or using the multi-controller joystick until the language you want to select is highlighted. Press the Set button to activate. Your choices include English, German, French, Dutch, Danish, Portuguese, Finnish, Italian, Norwegian, Swedish, Spanish, Greek, Russian, Polish, Simplified Chinese, Traditional Chinese, Korean, and Japanese.

If you accidentally set a language you don't read and find yourself with incomprehensible menus, don't panic. Just choose the third option from the top of the Set-up 2 menu, and select the idioma, sprache, langue, or kieli of your choice.

Video System

This setting controls the output of the 40D through the AV cable when you're displaying images on an external monitor. You can select either NTSC, used in the United States, Canada, Mexico, many Central, South American, and Caribbean countries, much of Asia, and other countries; or PAL, which is used in the UK, much of Europe, Africa, India, China, and parts of the Middle East.

Sensor Cleaning: Auto

One of the Canon EOS 40D's best new features is the automatic sensor cleaning system that reduces or eliminates the need to clean your camera's sensor manually using brushes, swabs, or bulb blowers (you'll find instructions on how to do that in Chapter 9). Canon has applied anti-static coatings to the sensor and other portions of the camera body interior to counter charge build-ups that attract dust. A separate filter over the sensor vibrates ultrasonically each time the 40D is powered on or off, shaking loose any dust, which is captured by a sticky strip beneath the sensor.

Use this menu entry (shown in Figure 3.25) to enable or disable automatic sensor cleaning on power up (select Auto Cleaning to choose) to activate automatic cleaning during a shooting session (select Clean Now). You can also choose the Clean manually option to flip up the mirror and clean the sensor yourself with a blower, brush, or swab, as described in Chapter 9. If the battery level is too low to safely carry out the cleaning operation, the 40D will let you know and refuse to proceed, unless you use the optional AC Adapter Kit ACK-E2.

LCD Brightness i i T i i rljij Date/Time 03/04/'08 11:14 Language English

Video System NTSC Sensor Cleaning Live View function settings Flash Control

Figure 3.25

Use this menu choice to activate automatic sensor cleaning or enable/disable it on power up.

Live View Function Settings

Here is where you adjust the EOS 40D's Live View functions, which enable you to work with a real-time LCD display as you preview and compose your image. I'm going to provide detailed instructions for using Live View in Chapter 5, as some functions are controlled here, and some are set in the Custom Functions menus (described later in this chapter). You'll want to review the Live View section of Chapter 5 for detailed information on how to use the four settings you can make from this menu entry.

■ Live View shooting. Activates Live View. Choose Disable to turn the feature off; select Enable and Live View will be activated when you press the Set button.

■ Grid Display. Overlays a "rule of thirds" grid on the LCD to help with alignment and composition.

■ Silent Shooting. Provides a quieter shutter sound when taking pictures using Live View. There are two modes: Mode 1 reduces the noise level of the shutter, but allows taking several shots in succession, including continuous shooting at about 6 fps. Mode 2 reduces the noise even further by delaying the action when you press the shutter release down (only a slight click is heard). When you let up slightly on the shutter release, the shot is taken, producing another soft click. Continuous shooting is not possible in Mode 2. Silent shooting can also be disabled entirely.

■ Metering Timer. This option turns off the exposure meter after a specified period of time (4, 16, or 30 seconds, plus 1, 10, and 30 minutes).

Flash Control

This multi-level menu entry includes five settings for controlling the Canon EOS 40D's built-in, pop-up electronic flash unit, as well as accessory flash units you can attach to the camera. (See Figure 3.26.) I'll provide in-depth coverage of how you can use these options in Chapter 6, but will list the main options here for reference.

Flash Firing

Use this option to enable or disable the built-in electronic flash. You might want to totally disable the 40D's flash (both built-in and accessory flash) when shooting in sensitive environments, such as concerts, in museums, or during religious ceremonies. When disabled, the flash cannot fire even if you accidentally elevate it, or have an accessory flash attached and turned on.

Flash control

Flash firing Enable

Built-in flash func. setting External flash func. setting External flash C. Fn. setting Clear ext. flash C. Fn. set.

The Flash Control menu entry has five setting submenus.

Built-in Flash Function Setting

There are three choices for this menu choice (the Flash mode entry is grayed out and cannot be selected):

■ Shutter sync. You can choose 1st Curtain sync, which fires the flash as soon as the shutter is completely open (this is the default mode). Alternatively, you can select 2nd Curtain sync, which fires the flash as soon as the shutter opens, and then triggers a second flash at the end of the exposure, just before the shutter starts to close. This action allows photographing a blurred trail of light of moving objects with sharp flash exposures at the beginning and the end of the exposure. This type of flash exposure is slightly different from what some other cameras produce using 2nd Curtain sync. I'll explain how it works in Chapter 6.

■ Flash exposure compensation. If you'd rather adjust flash exposure using a menu than with the ISO/Flash exposure compensation button, you can do that here. Select this option with the Set button, then dial in the amount of flash EV compensation you want using the multi-controller or Quick Control Dial. The EV that was in place before you started to make your adjustment is shown as a blue indicator, so you can return to that value quickly. Press Set again to confirm your change, then press the Menu button twice to exit.

■ E-TTL II. You can choose Evaluative (matrix) or Average metering modes for the electronic flash exposure meter. Evaluative looks at selected areas in the scene to calculate exposure, while Average calculates flash exposure by reading the entire scene.

External Flash Function Setting

You can access this menu only when you have a compatible electronic flash attached and switched on. The settings available are shown in Figure 3.27. If you press the INFO. button while adjusting flash settings, both the changes made to the settings of an attached external flash and to the built-in flash will be cleared.

■ Flash mode. This entry allows you to set the flash mode for the external flash, from E-TTL II, A-TTL, or TTL. All three provide through-the lens flash metering, but with different degrees of sophistication. E-TTL (Evaluative Through-The-Lens) uses a preflash just prior to taking the picture to allow the camera's metering sensor to read the flash exposure and compare it with ambient light to provide the best exposure. A-TTL (Advanced Through-The-Lens) metering is an earlier system used with some Canon speedlights to read illumination through the lens, but concentrate sensitivity on the active focus point, also using a preflash. The TTL (Through-The Lens) system is a less sophisticated flash exposure control system used by some flash units. It doesn't use a preflash. You should always choose E-TTL if your flash supports it, or select one of the other systems compatible with the speedlite you are using.

Figure 3.27

External flash units can be controlled from the Canon EOS 40D using this menu.

External flash func. setting

Flash mode E-TTL II

Shutter sync. 1st. curtain

E-TTL II Evaluative

Zoom Auto

Evaluative Auto

Clear Speedlite settings

■ Shutter sync. As with the 40D's internal flash, you can choose 1st Curtain sync, which fires the flash as soon as the shutter is completely open (this is the default mode). Alternatively, you can select 2nd Curtain sync, which fires the flash as soon as the shutter opens, and then triggers a second flash at the end of the exposure, just before the shutter starts to close.

■ FEB. Flash Exposure Bracketing (FEB) operates similarly to ordinary exposure bracketing, providing a series of different exposures to improve your chances of getting the exact right exposure, or to provide alternative renditions for creative purposes.

■ Flash exposure compensation. You can adjust flash exposure using a menu here. Select this option with the Set button, then dial in the amount of flash EV compensation you want using the multi-controller or Quick Control Dial. The EV that was in place before you started to make your adjustment is shown as a blue indicator, so you can return to that value quickly. Press Set again to confirm your change, then press the Menu button twice to exit.

■ E-TTL II. You can choose Evaluative (matrix) or Average metering modes for the electronic flash exposure meter. Evaluative looks at selected areas in the scene to calculate exposure, while Average calculates flash exposure by reading the entire scene.

■ Zoom. Some flash units can vary their coverage to better match the field of view of your lens at a particular focal length. You can allow the external flash to zoom automatically, based on information provided, or manually, using a zoom button on the flash itself.

External Flash Custom Function Setting

Many external Speedlites from Canon include their own list of Custom Functions, which can be used to specify things like flash metering mode and flash bracketing sequences, as well as more sophisticated features, such as modeling light/flash (if available), use of external power sources (if attached), and functions of any slave unit attached to the external flash. This menu entry allows you to set an external flash unit's Custom Functions from your 40D's menu.

Clear External Flash Custom Function Setting

This entry allows you to zero-out any changes you've made to your external flash's Custom Functions, and return them to their factory default settings.

Camera User Setting

This entry, the first in the third Set-up menu tab, allows you to register your EOS 40D's current camera shooting settings and file them away in the C1, C2, or C3 positions on the Mode Dial. Doing this overwrites any settings previously stored at that Camera User position. You can also clear the settings for any of the three Mode Dial positions individually, returning them to their factory default values.

Clear All Camera Settings

This menu choice resets all the settings to their default values. Regardless of how you've set up your EOS 40D, it will be adjusted for One-Shot AF mode, automatic AF point selection, evaluative metering, JPEG Fine Large image quality, automatic ISO, sRGB color mode, automatic white balance, and Standard Picture Style. Any changes you've made to exposure compensation, flash exposure compensation, and white balance will be canceled, and any bracketing for exposure or white balance nullified. Custom white balances and Dust Delete Data will be erased.

However, Custom Functions and Camera User Settings will not be cleared. If you want to cancel those as well, you'll need to use the Camera User Setting option (described previously) and the Custom Functions clearing option, which I'll describe shortly.

Firmware Version

You can see the current firmware release in use in the menu listing. If you want to update to a new firmware version, insert a memory card containing the binary file, and press the Set button to begin the process. You can read more about firmware updates in Chapter 9.

Custom Functions I/II/III/IV_

Custom Functions let you customize the behavior of your camera in a variety of different ways, ranging from whether or not the flash fires automatically to the function carried out when the Set button is pressed. If you don't like the default way the camera carries out a particular task, you just may be able to do something about it. You can find the Custom Functions in their own menu, color-coded orange.

We can grudgingly thank Canon for redesigning and partially simplifying setting of Custom Functions when the EOS 40D was created. With this camera's predecessor, the EOS 30D, all 19 functions were crowded onto one screen, with two cryptic rows of settings (from 01 to 10 on the top row, and 11 to 19 on the bottom row), each with a series of numbers beneath the settings row that represented the current value of that Custom Function. So, you could tell at a glance that the numeral 1 underneath Setting 02 meant... uh, that Setting 02, whatever it was, was adjusted to something other than its default value (because 0s represented the defaults). It was hard enough to figure out what a setting meant, and even more difficult to find the setting you wanted to change quickly.

In increasing the number of custom settings from 19 to 24 for the EOS 40D, Canon obviously realized that the old system was unwieldy. Indeed, the number of C. Fn. settings actually increased by more than five; several options that were grouped in the Custom Functions menu with the EOS 30D were moved to other locations (for example, the 30D's flash-related C. Fn 07, 14, and 15 were relocated to the Flash Control entry in the Set-up 2 menu). A few others were deleted entirely: the 30D's C. Fn 11 was used to set whether the first entry in a menu or the last menu item accessed was highlighted when the Menu button was pressed. With the 40D, the last menu item accessed is always highlighted (unless you've specified that the My Menu tab always be displayed first).

So, the Custom Functions options have been cleaned up, reorganized, and expanded. Canon has made adjusting these options only slightly less unwieldy by dividing them into four sub-menus that, at least, give you a fighting chance of finding the Custom Function you want by organizing them by type of feature. The four categories, shown in Figure 3.28, are: Exposure, Image, Auto focus/Drive, Operation/Others. The menu also has an option for clearing all the Custom Functions and returning them to their default values. I'm going to explain each of the categories of Custom Functions separately, but first you need your introduction into the mysteries of Canon's still-cryptic method of setting them.

Each of the Custom Functions is set in exactly the same way, so I'm not going to bog you down with a bunch of illustrations showing how to make this setting or that. One quick run-through using Figure 3.29 should be enough. Here are the key parts of the Custom Function screen:

■ Custom function category. At the top of the Settings screen is a label that tells you which category that screen represents.

■ Current Function name. Use the Quick Control Dial to select the function you want to adjust. The name of the function currently selected appears at the top of the screen, and its number is marked with an overscore in the row of numbers at the bottom of the screen. You don't need to memorize the function numbers.

The 24 Custom Functions are divided into submenus in four categories.

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