Using an External Flash

On the top of the camera sits a hotshoe, a fairly standard camera interface that allows you to use a number of different accessories. It's called a hotshoe because it's an interface that provides electrical contacts through which the camera can communicate with an attached accessory as opposed to a coldshoe, which has the same type of mount but provides no communication between the camera body and whatever is in the shoe . You can attach an external flash to the hotshoe on the top of the...

Recovering Deleted Images

There will probably come a day when you will accidentally delete an image, or even accidentally format your camera's media card. You might be able to recover deleted images from your camera's media card. The reason it's possible to recover files that have been erased is that when you delete a file, the camera doesn't actually erase the image data. Instead, it removes that image's entry from the directory of contents on the card and marks that image's space as available. Even if you have already...

Using Only The Center Focus Point

Center Point Focus

Some people like to set the focus point on the center point to gain better control of the camera's autofocus mechanism. The technique works like this set the T1i to the center focus point, and from now on you'll know that the camera will always focus on the center. If you have a tricky composition, you can place the center focus point on your subject, press the shutter button down halfway to lock focus, and then reframe while continuing to hold down the shutter button. To guarantee that the...

Shooting in Low Light at High ISO

You've seen how you can increase the Tli's ISO setting to buy yourself more exposure latitude when choosing a shutter speed or aperture, but you'll most often increase ISO when you want to shoot in lower light. Very often, this won't be extreme dark but rather just a small change to compensate for lower light indoors. For example, if you move indoors in the late afternoon, even into a room with windows, you might need to increase your ISO to 200 or 400. On the T1i, you can easily shoot at up to...

Depth of Field Preview

To ensure a viewfinder that's as bright as possible, the T1i keeps its aperture open as wide as possible all the time. Even if you or the camera have chosen a very small aperture, the aperture stays open all the way until you actually take the picture. Then the aperture closes down to the specified setting, and the sensor is exposed. In addition to letting as much light into the viewfinder as possible, the fact that the aperture is always wide open means you're possibly seeing less depth of...

Knowing Your Aperture Sweet Spot

Many people assume if they want a shallow depth of field, they should just choose the widest aperture smallest number that they can, and if they want a deep depth of field, they should choose the smallest aperture largest number . Obviously, these aperture extremes can yield shutter speeds that may not be suitable, but there's another price to pay for this simplified approach to depth of field. Every lens has an aperture sweet spot. If you go outside of this sweet spot, the lens will yield...