Metering and Auto ISO

If you set the T1i's ISO setting to Auto, then the camera will adjust the ISO as well as the shutter speed and aperture when it meters. Because there's little difference in noise from ISO 100 to 400, Auto ISO helps ensure that you have a shutter speed that's suited to handholding and an aperture that will yield good focus. WARNING Don't Use Evaluative Metering When Focusing and Reframing Earlier, you saw the technique of using a single, centered focus spot to focus on an object and then...

Changing White Balance

As I explained in the previous section, when you shoot raw, all white balance adjustment functions are deferred until later and are performed on your computer. This means you can set the white balance to anything you want after you've shot the image So, if you were shooting in an especially tricky white balance situation, you could simply perform the equivalent of a manual white balance while editing your image on your computer. With a raw file, you can achieve radically different white...

Raw Shooting

USING RAW FORMAT TO GAIN MORE CONTROL AND BETTER IMAGE QUALITY The Rebel T1i produces excellent JPEG images, but if you do a lot of image editing, want the absolute best color you can manage, or tend to shoot in extreme lighting situations that make exposure and white balance tricky, then you'll want to look at raw shooting. Shooting raw has its drawbacks, but by the end of this chapter, shooting in raw will probably become a regular part of your photographic life. In fact, don't be surprised...

Image Stabilization

If you have a lens with image stabilization (or IS), then you have some more handheld shooting latitude. For example, the 18-55mm lens that Canon bundles with the Rebel T1i includes built-in stabilization, as do many other Canon lenses and several third-party lenses. Image stabilization is a seemingly magical technology. When activated, the stabilization system detects tiny movements of the camera and adjusts its optics on the fly to counteract those movements, resulting in a more stable image....

Chapter Program Mode

Taking control and understanding more about exposure 105 Switching to Program Focusing Focus What to Do When Autofocus Doesn't 113 Getting Creative with Program Handheld Shooting and Shutter Changing the White Drive Mode and the Choosing an Image Size and Summing Up Program Creative Auto Learning more about the t1i light meter and exposure The Light Meter What Your Light Meter Actually Meters 149 Exposing So That Black Looks Black 150 Using Exposure Compensation to Over- or Underexpose 151...

THE Ti And Bad Weather

While the Rebel T1i can handle light rain, it's not going to do so well in heavy rain, or submersed in water. If you accidentally submerge your camera, take it out of the water immediately and don't turn it on. Remove the battery and media card and let the camera sit for several days to dry out. To speed drying, place the camera in a bowl and cover it with dry, uncooked rice. The rice will act as a desiccant and can help speed drying. After a few days, try powering up the camera. If it works...

Shooting Sports or Stage Performances

Even though sporting events are often held at night and stage performances are often in dark auditoriums, these events are not necessarily low-light events. A football field, for example, is usually well lit. However, even with all the floodlighting, you still probably won't be able to get away with shooting at ISO 100 or even 400. Also, for a sporting event you'll probably want some motion-stopping power in your exposure and so will be using a longer shutter speed. This means you'll most...

ISO The Third Exposure Parameter

In a digital camera, you have one additional parameter that you can change to control exposure. As you just learned, your image sensor measures voltages on the sensor's surface to determine how much light struck each pixel. These voltages must be amplified before they can be measured. If you amplify the voltages more, then the sensor will effectively be more light-sensitive because dimmer light levels will be boosted. ISO is a standard for measuring the sensitivity of film. Digital vendors have...

Shutter Speed

As you've learned, the shutter sits just in front of the image sensor and opens and closes to expose the sensor to light. The shutter speed that you (or the camera) chooses determines how long the shutter will stay open. Shutter speeds are measured in seconds, and a longer shutter speed exposes the sensor to light for a longer period of time than a shorter shutter speed. The T1i has a shutter speed range of 1 4,000th of a second on the fast end to 30 seconds on the slow end. The T1i also...

Are You In Autofocus

If your camera doesn't beep or flash the confirmation light when you half-press the shutter, your lens might be set to manual focus mode. somewhere on the body of the lens should be a switch for changing from auto to manual focus. If your camera doesn't beep or flash the confirmation light when you half-press the shutter, your lens might be set to manual focus mode. somewhere on the body of the lens should be a switch for changing from auto to manual focus. Your lens should have a way to change...

Word About Dynamic Range

There is a range from very dark to very bright wherein your eyes can see detail. Below this range, things are too dark, and above this range, things are painfully bright. This is called dynamic range, and in humans, it's about 18 stops wide. That is, there are about 18 doublings of light from darkest to lightest. Unfortunately, like all cameras, the Rebel T1i has a much smaller dynamic range than what the human eye can perceive. About half the range, actually. This means that, with a single...

Autofocus or How to Press the Shutter Button

With your shot framed, you're ready to shoot. However, although pressing the shutter button may seem a simple thing, there are some important things to understand about it, because it's your key to the camera's autofocus feature. Once you've framed the shot, press the shutter button halfway. When you do this, the camera will analyze your scene and try to determine what the subject is. The camera can analyze nine focus points. Once the T1i has determined the subject (or what it thinks is the...

The Rebel Ti Menu System

Many of the Rebel Tli's features are accessed through the camera's menu system. When shooting in a rapidly changing environment, such as a sporting event, busy street, or birthday party, you'll want to be able to quickly change camera settings, so it's important to be able to use the camera's menus speedily and efficiently. Fortunately, the T1i has a very good menu layout, so with just a little practice, you should find that you can get to any option you want very quickly. The contents of the...

The Rebel Ti Sensor

In Chapter 2 we took a quick look at the anatomy of your Rebel T1i, and you learned something about the architecture of an SLR camera. In that discussion I mentioned the image sensor in your camera. As you already know, in a digital camera, the image sensor takes the place of a piece of film and is the mechanism by which the camera can see an image. The image sensor is a chip that is mounted parallel to the back of the camera so that the light focused by the lens hits it head-on. In the Rebel...

Exposure Compensation and Program Shift

In Chapter 6 you learned about Program Shift, which lets you automatically switch between reciprocal exposure settings after the camera has metered. Program Shift makes it easy to quickly switch to a different shutter speed or aperture while maintaining a good exposure. However, because Program Shift always changes to a reciprocal exposure, it never gives you an over- or underexposure, but you can dial in an exposure compensation for that, and you can easily use these two features in concert....

Switching to Program Mode

In Chapter 1, I showed you the Mode dial, the dial on the right side of the top of the camera that you use to select a shooting mode. Each mode specifies a different set of parameters that the camera will handle automatically. For this chapter, change the shooting mode to P, Program mode. Program mode is a lot like Full Auto mode in that your camera will automatically determine shutter speed and aperture for you, and can be set to automatically calculate white balance and ISO. However, Program...

Highlight Recovery

Raw files also allow you to perform a seemingly magical type of edit. You've seen what happens to a JPEG image when you overexpose the highlights they turn to complete white and lose all detail. No matter how you edit the image, that detail is gone, and those areas will remain white. With a raw file, though, there's a good chance you'll be able to recover the lost detail in your overexposed highlights. If recovering data from nothing seems impossible, know that an overexposed white area is not...

How Shutter Speed Choice Affects Your Image

This next bit should be pretty intuitive. As you choose a faster shutter speed, you will have more ability to freeze motion in a scene. That is, when the shutter is open for a very short time, a moving subject will be frozen. When the shutter is open for a longer time, a moving subject will be blurry and smeared. With a slower shutter speed, you can blur your subject to create a more dynamic image. With a slower shutter speed, you can blur your subject to create a more dynamic image. You may...

Shooting Techniques for Low Light Situations

Unfortunately, shooting in low light is a little more complicated than just choosing a high ISO and shooting away. Your main concern is to be aware of shutter speed. Remember the handheld shooting rule (shutter speed should never go below 1 effective focal length), and keep an eye on the shutter speed in the viewfinder status display. Note too that you can usually hear a slow shutter speed, if you're paying attention. If the click of the camera takes a bit longer than you're used to, you might...

White Balance Presets

By default, your Rebel T1i is set up to use the Auto White Balance feature, which uses complex algorithms to analyze the color in your scene to determine what's what and then calibrates itself to those white values. This is the only white balance option that's available in Full Auto mode, but in Program mode, you can override the Auto White Balance and opt for some more manual control. Why would you ever want to do this Because as good as the Auto White Balance is, it can be confused. Consider...

Some Lens Suggestions

Here are my recommendations for currently available Canon lenses that fill the different lens categories we mentioned earlier. Canon EF-S 55-250 f4-5.6 IS Offering a direct extension of the focal length range provided by the 18-55, this lens extends your shooting range to the equivalent of a 400mm lens. Because it's an EF-S lens, the 55-250 is smaller than full-frame lenses that offer the same range. However, because it's only about 300, the 55-250 is definitely less sturdy than some...

What Is

In Chapter 7, you saw how, with JPEGs, the camera takes the data off the image sensor and performs a number of processes to it, from white balance adjustment to gamma correction to a number of corrections and adjustments similar to what you might apply in an image editor. You also learned that one of the last things the camera does before saving a JPEG image is throw out a lot of color data so that the 14-bit image that the camera captured can be stored in the 8-bit space that the JPEG format...

Shooting Panoramas

No matter how wide your lens might go, there will still be times when you face a vista that just can't be captured in one frame. In the old days, your only choice would have been to shoot and layer a series of images together to create a collage. Nothing is wrong with this technique, and it can actually be quite evocative, but thanks to digital image processing, we have another option. Now you can take those same images, and, rather than layering them together as a collage, you can digitally...

Beep and Power Off

As you've already probably noticed, your T1i makes a beep any time you autofocus or use the self-timer. You can deactivate this feature by selecting Beep from the first shooting menu. Silencing your camera can be essential for shooting in auditoriums or museums. By default, the camera shuts off after 30 seconds of inactivity. This helps conserve battery power, but there are times when it can be annoying. For example, if you're shooting a product setup or still life and have the camera mounted...

Raw Hassles the Disadvantages

I shoot exclusively raw on all the cameras that support raw format. But raw shooting does present some extra headaches that you won't find when shooting JPEG images. As software improves, these headaches are getting fewer and fewer, and it's easy enough to work around them. However, before you dive into the world of raw, you'll want to consider these caveats Raw files take up more space Raw files are larger than JPEG files sometimes a lot larger. JPEG compression is very effective at squeezing...

Activating Live View

You can use Live View in Program mode, Shutter and Aperture Priority Mode, and Manual Mode. To activate Live View, press the the Live View button (ii) on the back of the camera. You'll hear a clunk as the mirror flips up, and then the viewfinder will light up with your current scene. When you switch to Live View, the Rebel T1i first shows a focusing reminder screen, and then your current scene. When you switch to Live View, the Rebel T1i first shows a focusing reminder screen, and then your...

Creating Your Own Picture Style

The T1i supports up to three user-defined styles. You edit these just like you would any other style. From the Picture Style menu, select User Def. 1, 2, or 3, and hit the DISP button. You can now edit the same four parameters for each setting. These user-defined picture styles appear on the Picture Style menu when you press the down arrow key, just like any other picture style. If you're really serious about picture styles, you'll want to look at the Picture Style Editor application that's...

Choosing a Lens

Your first decision when choosing a lens is to determine what type of shooting you think you want to be able to do. The 18-55mm and 18-200mm lenses that ship with the T1i kits are great, general-purpose, walk-around lenses. They deliver good quality and are stabilized for easier low-light shooting. They also have a focal length range that's suitable for most everyday situations. So, what might you want in addition to one of these lenses Think about the following questions Do you often find you...

Over and Underexposure

At its most basic level, exposure is pretty easy to understand. If you turn out the light in your room at midnight, your eye won't be able to gather enough light for you to be able to see anything. In other words, your room is underexposed. Conversely, if someone shines a bright light in your eyes, you may not be able to see because the sensors in your eyes will get overdriven. In other words, your field of view will be overexposed. The image sensor in your camera (or a piece of film in a film...

Changing the ISO

In the previous chapter you learned that the ISO setting controls how light sensitive the Tli's sensor is. A higher ISO number means the camera's sensor is more sensitive. This means it can gather light more quickly, which allows you to use shorter shutter speeds and smaller apertures. For times when you need lots of motion-stopping power or a deep depth of field, the ability to increase your ISO can make the difference between getting and missing the shot. But in addition to creative latitude,...

Art and Craft

Throughout this whole process of working a shot and trying to make a composition, you will be constantly employing the technical concepts you've learned so far. For example, you might be working a scene, moving around, getting in close, and then you find a focal length and camera position that creates a wonderful sense of space and that allows a composition that is balanced, with a nice subject background relationship. But then you realize that what would make it perfect is to soften the...

Aperture

Like shutter speed, the size of the aperture (which we discussed earlier) can be controlled automatically by the camera or manually by you. Aperture size is measured in f-stops, and an f-stop number is often fractional, so you'll see f-stops with values such as f5.6, f8, or f11. QUESTION What Do Those Numbers Mean An f-stop is a measure of the ratio of the focal length of the lens to the size of the aperture. Many of the numbers are fractional because you're dealing with the area of a circle,...

Setting ISO

By default, the T1i uses an Auto ISO setting. This means the camera is free to change the ISO any time it thinks it needs to do so to get a better exposure or an exposure with a shutter speed that's fast enough for handheld shooting. At times, though, you won't want the camera to change the ISO. For example, if you're trying to shoot with very specific shutter speeds or aperture settings, you might find you need to lock the ISO down to get the exposure settings you want. Or, if you're shooting...

Shooting in Low Light at High ISO

You've seen how you can increase the Tli's ISO setting to buy yourself more exposure latitude when choosing a shutter speed or aperture, but you'll most often increase ISO when you want to shoot in lower light. Very often, this won't be extreme dark but rather just a small change to compensate for lower light indoors. For example, if you move indoors in the late afternoon, even into a room with windows, you might need to increase your ISO to 200 or 400. On the T1i, you can easily shoot at up to...

Lens Care

Obviously, with a big expensive piece of glass like a camera lens, dropping it is not a good idea. Your other concern with a lens, though, is keeping it clean and scratch-free. In the previous section, I mentioned the possibility of dust getting in the mirror chamber of the camera. If the dust alights on the sensor, then you'll see visible smudges and smears in your image. Most sensor dust is actually delivered to the inside of the camera by the end of the lens, so one of the best things you...

Flash Exposure

When you half-press the shutter button while the flash is popped up, the T1i calculates an exposure, just as it does when the flash is down. However, with the flash up, it bases its exposure on its understanding of how much light the flash will be able to add to the scene. In Program mode, the camera will never pick a shutter speed slower than 60, to ensure handheld shooting. It will also never pick a shutter speed faster than 200, because it's not possible for the entire sensor to be exposed...

Creative Auto Mode

Between Full Auto and Program mode on the Mode dial is Creative Auto mode, which looks like this As you would expect, Creative Auto tries to split the difference between Full Auto and Program modes. It still makes most critical decisions for you, just like Full Auto, but affords you a simple method for taking a little more creative control. When you activate Creative Auto mode, the display on the back of the camera will change. Shutter speed and aperture will still be shown on the top of the...

White Balance Bracketing

At times you'll come into a lighting situation that you know is going to trip up the Tli's Auto White Balance and for which there's no suitable white balance preset. Obviously, the ideal solution in these instances is to use a custom white balance, but this isn't always possible. White balance bracketing is another good option for these instances. Bracketing is the process of shooting multiple exposures of the same scene with slightly different settings. It's usually used for varying exposure,...

Transferring from Your Camera

Every image you shoot is stored on your camera's media card as an individual file. The file is a document, just like one you might create on your computer. Before you can do any editing of your images using your computer, you have to copy those image documents from your camera's media card onto your computer's hard drive. There are two ways to transfer images from your camera. Either plug the camera directly into your computer, or remove its media card and place it in a media reader that is...

Jpeg Image Processing

Earlier, you learned the basics of how the image sensor in your Rebel T1i works. You learned that the image sensor can measure the light that strikes each pixel on its surface, and that to calculate color, a complex interpolation process is employed. In fact, though, there's actually a lot more that goes on in the camera when you shoot in JPEG mode (which is the only type of shooting we've done so far). After reading the data off the sensor, amplifying it, and interpolating the color values,...

Summing Up Program Mode

Program mode is probably the mode you'll use most often on the T1i, and the reasons why should be becoming clear to you. Like Full Auto mode, Program mode can automatically focus and choose an exposure, white balance, and ISO for you. But, unlike Full Auto and Creative Auto mode, you can take control of all of these parameters, and choose a shutter speed or aperture that's better suited to your creative goals and adjust ISO if you need more latitude for your exposure settings. You can override...

Aperture Priority

To use Aperture Priority, set the T1i's Mode dial to Av. In Aperture Priority mode, you select the aperture you want, and the camera automatically chooses an appropriate shutter speed, based on its metering. In Aperture Priority mode, the rear LCD will display the current aperture setting in a gray box, with arrows on both sides to indicate that you can change this parameter. Turn the Main dial to change the aperture. When you half-press the shutter to meter, the camera will display the shutter...

Focus Modes

Canon calls the type of focusing we've been doing so far one-shot autofocus. No matter which focus point you're using, you set focus once for your shot and then take the picture. If you're shooting a moving subject, though, especially one that's moving toward you, then you might have to refocus several times. Remember when you focus, you're focusing on an object that's at a specified distance. If that object moves closer or farther, then your focus will no longer be accurate. If it moves side...

White Balance Shift

Sometimes neither Auto White Balance nor the white balance preset is quite right for your situation. If a custom white balance is not an option perhaps you don't have a white reference available , then you can always use the Tli's White Balance Shift feature. This is a fairly advanced option that is intended for shooters who are used to balancing light using colored filters. Such a topic is beyond the scope of this book, but even without an understanding of filter use, or mireds a unit of...

Processing Your Raw Files

When you're done shooting, copy your raw files to your computer using whatever technique you normally use for JPEGs. If you're using a version of Photoshop or Photoshop Elements, Aperture, Lightroom, or iPhoto, then you'll be able to work with your images just as if they were JPEGs. The browser functions built into these applications will be able to read the files assuming they've been updated with T1i support and display thumbnails. iPhoto, Aperture, and Lightroom let you use the same editing...

Depth of Field Preview

To ensure a viewfinder that's as bright as possible, the T1i keeps its aperture open as wide as possible all the time. Even if you or the camera have chosen a very small aperture, the aperture stays open all the way until you actually take the picture. Then the aperture closes down to the specified setting, and the sensor is exposed. In addition to letting as much light into the viewfinder as possible, the fact that the aperture is always wide open means you're possibly seeing less depth of...

Exposing So That Black Looks Black

Black objects are more likely to trip up the T1i's meter than are white objects. Again, if you point the camera at a black object, it will assume that the object is actually 18 gray and so will concoct exposure settings that will properly render that object as gray. Consequently, black objects can sometimes appear ashen. For instance, in this shot of a black car, the blacks are not as black as they could be, because the meter assumed that the car was actually gray and so chose exposure settings...

Manual Mode

For the ultimate in control, you'll want to use Manual mode, which lets you adjust both aperture and shutter speed. To activate Manual mode, move the Mode dial to M. The LCD screen will show both the shutter speed and aperture, with a box around the shutter speed. In Manual mode, you can change both shutter speed and aperture. The menu highlights which parameter is currently editable. Here, we're changing shutter speed. You can change shutter speed by turning the Main dial. If you want to...

Image Anatomy

You need to learn an additional bit of theory if you want to get the most out of your image-editing software. Just as good film shooters needed to have a certain understanding of film and paper chemistry, as a digital shooter you need to know something about how a digital image is constructed. Pixel is a pretty common term these days, and I've been using it off and on already, but just in case there's any confusion about it, here's a definition pixel stands for picture element and is used to...

What to Do When Autofocus Doesnt

The autofocus mechanism in the Rebel T1i is dependent on contrast the sharp edges in an image are composed of high-contrast lines. A crop of this image shows how much contrast there is. The lower crop shows an unfocused version of the image. As you can see, there is very little contrast in the image, since it is out of focus. When you half-press the shutter button on the T1i, it measures the contrast in your scene, and then it zooms in a little and measures the contrast again. If the contrast...

Displaying Your Images On A Tv

Viewing your image on a TV is a great way of showing your images to other people as a slideshow, but it can also be handy for shooting in a studio. If you're working with a model or shooting product shots, put your camera on a tripod and connect it to a TV while you're shooting. The same image review that displays on your camera's LCD screen will be shown on the attached TV. Your model, client, makeup crew, or anyone else in the room can see the shots right away and adjust their work...

Understanding Focus Points

The T1i uses a nine-point autofous system. You've already experienced the nine autofocus points in the work you've done in Full Auto mode. So, you know that when you half-press the shutter button to autofocus, the camera assesses your scene and tries to determine what the subject is. It then focuses on that subject. To let you know what it has focused on, the T1i lights up any of the autofocus points that are on the subject it has chosen. When focusing, it's important to keep an eye on which...

Picture Styles White Balance and

Picture styles and white balance are functions that are performed by the camera during the image-processing steps that happen after you take a shot. Because raw files have no processing applied to them, picture styles and white balance choice are less significant. However, the white balance setting you choose is stored in the image's metadata. Later, your raw converter will read this setting and use it as the default white balance for that image. Because white balance in a raw file is...

Adjusting Predefined Picture Styles

You can tweak the six predefined picture styles by adjusting saturation, color tone, and contrast within the camera. Each of these parameters has a range from -4 to 4, whereas Sharpness has a range from 0 to 7. While you can't edit all of the effects of a picture style, these four parameters give you a fair amount of adjustment latitude. 1. To edit a picture style, select Picture Style from the second shooting menu. 2. Navigate to the picture style you want to edit, and then press the DISP...

Using an External Flash

On the top of the camera sits a hotshoe, a fairly standard camera interface that allows you to use a number of different accessories. It's called a hotshoe because it's an interface that provides electrical contacts through which the camera can communicate with an attached accessory as opposed to a coldshoe, which has the same type of mount but provides no communication between the camera body and whatever is in the shoe . You can attach an external flash to the hotshoe on the top of the...

Custom Functions

In Chapter 9, you got a glimpse of the T1i's custom functions when I discussed mirror lockup. Custom functions are special commands that you access through the Custom Functions command on the third tool menu. Although a few of these commands, such as Mirror Lockup, seem more like primary commands that should be in the normal menu system, the bulk of the custom functions are commands that let you tweak and alter the behavior of other commands. To alter a custom function, choose custom function...

Auto Bracketing

The T1i includes an auto bracketing feature that will perform an automatic exposure change for you, making it simple to take a bracketed set of shots. 1. To activate auto bracketing, choose Expo.Comp. AEB from the second shooting menu Expo Comp stands for Exposure Compensation, which you've already learned about. AEB stands for Auto Exposure Bracketing. When you select Expo.Comp AEB, you'll be taken to a new screen that lets you specify both a bracketing amount and an exposure compensation...

Fractional Stops

In the days of manual cameras, shutter speed and aperture controls used the progression of settings that we've looked at here, with one stop of exposure difference between each setting however, they provided a wider range than what I've shown . However, it's possible to adjust shutter speed and aperture by intervals that are smaller than a whole stop, and by default the T1i will use values that are fractions of stops. So, as you adjust the shutter speed control on the T1i, you might see a...

What Your Light Meter Actually Meters

Has this ever happened to you It's a nice snowy day, you take a picture, and when you look at the image, the snow seems much dingier than you remember. Surprisingly, this is not the camera doing something wrong. It's actually metering exactly the way it was designed. To understand what it's up to and how to fix it, you need to understand a little more about how a light meter works. Your light meter doesn't know anything about color it measures only luminance, or brightness. Perhaps the...

Snapshot Shooting in Full Auto Mode

The Rebel T1i has full autofocus and autoexposure features that can make all of the necessary photographic decisions for most situations. When in Full Auto mode, all you have to do is frame the shot and press the shutter button, and the camera will automatically figure out just about every other relevant setting. However, you need to know a few things to get the most out of Full Auto mode. On the top of the T1i, on the right side of the camera, is a Mode dial. The mode you choose determines...

Getting to Know the Rebel T i

If you're new to the Rebel T1 i, you're probably much more interested in shooting than in reading a book. So, in this chapter I'm going to quickly get you up to speed on the camera's automatic features so that you can get out the door right away and start using the camera. One of the great things about the T1i's design is that you can start out using it just like a point-and-shoot camera and then activate more sophisticated controls as you need them. This first chapter explains the fundamental...

Jpeg Image Processing continued

After gamma correction, the camera corrects the color according to the white balance settings on the camera. At this point, you have a very good-looking image that is recognizable as a quality color photo assuming you exposed well . But the camera still does more. Using the equivalent of an in-camera image-editing program, the T1i adjusts the contrast, color saturation, and color tone in your image, and then finally applies sharpening. These adjustments have nothing to do with any exposure...

Panoramic Exposure

From a panoramic photography standpoint, one of the things that's really annoying about the world is that it's not lit perfectly evenly. This problem is much more pronounced when shooting a panorama than when shooting a single frame. If you look at most any panoramic scene in the real world, you'll probably find that one end is brighter than the other. The reason this is a drag for panoramic shooting is that the area that's brighter will expose differently than the area that's darker, and when...

Exposure Lock

So far, you've been doing all of your metering using Evaluative gj metering. You've seen how, when you press the shutter button down halfway, the camera takes a meter reading and then locks that metering. If you reframe your shot, the camera will still use the metering that got locked in when you half-pressed the shutter buton. In Partial, Spot, and Centerweight metering, the camera will still meter when you half-press the shutter button, but if you reframe your shot, the T1i will re-meter as...

Knowing Your Aperture Sweet Spot

Many people assume if they want a shallow depth of field, they should just choose the widest aperture smallest number that they can, and if they want a deep depth of field, they should choose the smallest aperture largest number . Obviously, these aperture extremes can yield shutter speeds that may not be suitable, but there's another price to pay for this simplified approach to depth of field. Every lens has an aperture sweet spot. If you go outside of this sweet spot, the lens will yield...

Sensor Cleaning

Digital Sensor Cleaning

Because you can remove the lens on the T1i, the sensor chamber is exposed to the outside world in a way that it never is on a point-and-shoot camera. This means it's possible for dust and other fine debris to get on the image sensor. And, because you don't ever remove the sensor and replace it with another one as you do with the film in a film camera once there's dust on the sensor, it's there to stay unless you take action. Pixels on your sensor are very, very tiny. Remember, 15 million of...

The Viewfinder Status Display

When you press the shutter button halfway down, several things happen inside the T1i's viewfinder. As I already mentioned, the camera shows you which focus points it has selected for autofocus. It also uses the readout at the bottom of the viewfinder to tell you about its exposure choices and to give you some additional status information. The content of this readout will vary depending on the mode you're in. Flash Flash exp Exp. Lock Exp Lock comp. The Rebel T1i's viewfinder shows all the...

Adep Mode For Maximum

If you're shooting a landscape and want to ensure as much depth of field as possible, you have to choose settings that will yield a deep depth of field and focus at a point that will ensure that your depth of field covers the area you want. A-DEP is a special mode that will automatically try to calculate settings that will yield the maximum depth of field for your scene. To use it, switch the Mode dial to A-DEP, then frame your shot as you normally do, and press the shutter release halfway...

Red Eye Reduction

If you've spent a lot of time shooting flash snapshots with a point-and-shoot camera, then you've probably seen red eye, that creepy phenomenon that causes your subject's eyes to glow red. The red glow is nothing more than the reflection of the flash's light off the back of the subject's irises. Dogs' eyes, by comparison, reflect blue light. Although image-editing tools can remove this effect, it's often better to try to solve the problem while shooting to save editing time later. The closer...

Focusing in Live View

The problem with focusing in Live View is that the camera's autofocus sensors are located in the top of the camera, where the pentamirror is. In Live View mode, since the main mirror is flipped up, the autofocus sensors can't see out the lens. Therefore, to focus, you have to choose one of several options. If you switch your lens over to manual focus, you can manually focus the camera in Live View, just as you would if you were looking through the viewfinder. However, the LCD screen is not...

Custom White Balance

White Paper For White Balance

For the most accurate color, you'll want to use a custom white balance. Custom white balance is also the best choice when you're in a lighting situation for which there is no preset, such as a mixed lighting situation sunlight falling into a fluorescent-lit room, for example . Auto White Balance works by identifying something in your image that's probably white, usually a bright highlight. This area is then used as the basis for the camera's white balance analysis. White balance presets don't...

Peripheral Illumination Correction

Sometimes a lens will yield an image with dark corners, a phenomenon most commonly referred to as vignetting. This is most prevalent in wide-angle lenses or zoom lenses that are being used at their widest angle . For some reason, Canon has chosen to call this a drop in peripheral illumination, and so they have built a peripheral illumination correction feature into the Rebel T1i. Whatever you choose to call the problem, the ability to correct it in-camera is very handy. The image on the left...

Anatomy of the Rebel Ti

LEARNING TO HOLD AND CONTROL YOUR CAMERA In the previous chapter you saw how you can use the Rebel Tli's automatic features for easy snapshot shooting. Before we go on to learn about its more advanced shooting features, we're going to take a tour of the camera and learn its parts. The T1i is a complex tool, and the better you know its workings, the more easily and effectively you'll be able to make it do what you want.

Panning With A Slow Shutter Speed

When you shoot with a slow shutter speed to try to introduce blur into your shot, you have two choices you can hold the camera still, and let the object move through your scene to create a blurred subject, or you can pan the camera to follow your subject and create a blurred background. When shooting with a slow shutter speed, you can pan the camera to follow a moving subject, rendering the background a blur. To create a blurred background, you pan the camera while the shutter is open. It can...

Controlling Color Tone with Exposure Compensation

It should make sense that a slight underexposure will make black tones appear more black than gray and vice versa for white tones . You've seen already that an underexposed image is darker than a regular exposure, so a bit of underexposure can be just what you need to restore a dark object to its true tone. Like black and white, color also has a tone. Some reds are darker than others, for example. Consequently, it's possible to adjust the saturation of a color in your image by over- or...

Using Adobe Photoshop Elements for Windows

If you've installed Adobe Photoshop Elements 6 or later, when you attach a media card reader or camera to your computer, the Elements 6.0 Photo Downloader will launch automatically. The Photo Downloader lets you choose a location to store your files, and can create subfolders within that location based on the date and timestamp on each image. Photo Downloader can also rename your images from the nonsensical camera names to something more meaningful. If you click the Advanced Dialog button at...

Evaluative metering

By default, the T1i uses an evaluative meter system for its light metering. The T1i's evaluative meter divides your scene into a grid of 35 zones. The brightness of each zone is measured, as well as the contrast between zones, the size of your subject, the brightness of your subject, the contrast between your subject and the other zones in the grid, and more. It determines what is your subject by looking at which focus points were selected when the camera autofocused. It then analyzes all of...

Using Exposure Compensation to Over or Underexpose

Now that you've seen some of the occasions when you might want to over- or underexpose, we'll look at one of the ways that you can tell the camera to make such an exposure adjustment. There are many ways of controlling exposure on the T1i, but the easiest method is to use exposure compensation. These days, almost all cameras have an Exposure Compensation control, which simply lets you make a relative exposure change. That is, you can tell the camera, I don't care how you metered the scene I...

AE Lock button

Use AE Lock so that your exposure doesn't change when reframing while using Spot, Centerweight, or Partial metering. When you press the AE Lock button, an asterisk will appear in the viewfinder status display to indicate that your exposure is now locked. The asterisk indicates that the exposure is now locked. The asterisk indicates that the exposure is now locked. As you'll see later, there are some ways to customize the behavior of the shutter and AE Lock buttons so that they better-suit your...

More Editing Latitude

Let's return for a moment to the 8-bit versus 14-bit issue and take a closer look at the raw file's bit depth advantage over JPEG files. Simply put, shooting with raw is like having a box of 64 crayons, rather than a wimpy box of 16 crayons. Straight out of the camera, you won't see a difference between a 14-bit processed raw file and an 8-bit JPEG file. But once you start editing, you'll find that raw files offer a lot more flexibility. Smooth gradients and transitions are a critical component...

Adding Copyright Information

You've seen how your T1i embeds all essential exposure information as well as the date and time the image was shot, and more in the metadata of every image you take. In addition to all of this data, the T1i can also store a custom copyright message in your images. This is a great way to prove ownership of an image, especially if you plan on posting it to the Web. You create a copyright message using the Canon EOS Utility. If you have already installed the software from the EOS Solutions Disk,...

Handheld Shooting and Shutter Speed

No matter which mechanism you use, once you start fiddling with shutter speed, you have to be very careful about the shutter speed you choose. Pick one too low, and you'll run the risk of getting blurry images due to camera shake. The problem is simply that it's impossible to hold a camera perfectly still. As animals, we don't stand still, we sway it's a necessary part of balancing on two legs. When you throw in breathing and a beating heart and possible windy conditions, holding a couple of...

Getting Creative with Program Shift

In the previous chapter, you learned about the effects that different shutter speed and aperture choices have on your final image. You saw that by controlling shutter speed, you can choose how much you want to freeze or blur motion, and that by controlling aperture, you can choose how much you want to blur out the background. You also learned that these parameters have a reciprocal relationship if you change one, you can change the other to compensate. The Rebel T1i has a lot of different ways...

Stitching a Panorama

Once you've shot your panoramic frames, you'll be ready to stitch. Copy the pano frames to your computer using your method of choice. If you haven't already installed Canon PhotoStitch from the EOS Digital Solutions Disk, do so now and then launch the program. Click the Open button on the left side of the PhotoStitch toolbar. In the Open dialog box that appears, select the file you want to stitch. Hold down the Shift key to select multiple files. PhotoStitch will display your chosen images side...

Organizing Your Images

No matter which method you use to transfer images to your computer, if you're managing your image organization yourself as opposed to having a program such as iPhoto, Aperture, or Lightroom do it for you , you will want to think about how to organize your files. You'll be best-served in your organizational chores by making good use of folders. How to organize these folders is entirely a matter of personal preference just find a scheme that makes sense to you. You can create folders by subject...

The Light Meter Revisited

In Chapter 1, we looked at the T1i's light meter, which analyzes the light in your scene to determine an exposure that will yield an image that's neither too light nor too dark. The light meter is activated every time you half-press the shutter button, and while the automatic metering in the T1i is very good, it can be confused and won't always calculate the best exposure for every scene. For example, consider this image Bad backlighting is leaving the subject's face in shadow. Bad backlighting...

The Three Channel Histogram

If you press the DISP button one more time after seeing the first histogram, you'll get to the second histogram page. The Tli's three-channel histogram display shows a separate histogram for the red, green, and blue information in your image. This page shows the same histogram you saw before, along with an additional three-channel histogram. In Chapter 5 you learned that an image is made up of three separate channels of color information one red, one green, and one blue. The three-channel...

Using Only The Center Focus Point

Center Point Focus

Some people like to set the focus point on the center point to gain better control of the camera's autofocus mechanism. The technique works like this set the T1i to the center focus point, and from now on you'll know that the camera will always focus on the center. If you have a tricky composition, you can place the center focus point on your subject, press the shutter button down halfway to lock focus, and then reframe while continuing to hold down the shutter button. To guarantee that the...

Using the Histogram

One of the great things about digital photography is that you can see your images onscreen right away. In fact, we're now well into a generation of kids who've never known cameras to work any other way and for whom the idea of waiting to see an image makes about as much sense as having a guy deliver blocks of ice to the house. And while the image on the T1i's LCD does provide a great way to check your composition, it offers very little help when it comes to assessing your exposure choices. It's...

Manual Focus

While the T1i packs a great autofocus system, don't give short shrift to manual focus. By switching the focus switch on your lens from AF to MF, you get full manual control of focus. All T1i lenses will have a manual focus ring, though different lenses will put the focus ring on different sides of the zoom ring. Simply turn the ring to focus the lens. On some lenses, you must first switch the lens to manual focus before the manual focus ring will work. On other lenses, manual focus will...

Transferring Images Using Canon Image Browser

After installing the EOS Digital Solution Disk that shipped with your T1i, your Mac's default behavior will be to launch Canon's EOS Utility any time you plug in a camera or card reader. EOS Utility will let you copy images from your card to a specified folder, just like you can do by hand in the Finder. However, it offers you the ability to see preview thumbnails of your images, and to select only the files that you want to copy. It also lets you print your images, either as individual prints...

File Numbering Options

As you may have already noticed, image files that come out of the Rebel T1i have meaningless names. The T1i usually labels its images _IMG_, then a sequential number, and then a file extension, either JPG or CR2. By default, every time you start shooting, the camera picks up with the next number in the series, even if you change media cards. If you'd rather, you can configure the camera so that it starts with new numbers every time you change the card. With this scheme, though, you have to be...

Deleting All of the Images on the Card

Normally, you'll erase a card only after you've transferred its contents to your computer. However, sometimes you might need to erase an entire card in the field. Perhaps you realize you've been shooting for the last hour with manual settings that have grossly overexposed all your images. Or maybe you forgot to erase the card when you last transferred images to it and it's full of old pictures. In the Erase images menu that you saw in the previous section, there was an option to called Erase...

Program Mode

TAKING CONTROL AND UNDERSTANDING MORE ABOUT EXPOSURE So far, you've been using your camera in its fully automatic mode. In Full Auto mode, the camera makes all critical decisions for you. Program mode, on the other hand, provides a great balance of automatic and manual modes, letting you continue to shoot snapshot-style but with additional manual control when you need it. Because of this and because of the ease with which the T1i lets you take manual control when you need it, you'll probably...

Protecting Images

If you've shot a once-in-a-lifetime, keeper image that you absolutely don't want to lose, then you might consider protecting the image. This locks the file on the card so that it can't be deleted. If you're on a long trip and won't have the time or opportunity to clear off your media cards, protecting images provides a way of guaranteeing that an image won't be deleted by most normal erase options. To protect images, follow these steps 1. In the Playback menu, choose Protect Images. 2. Navigate...

Work with Fixed Focal Length

They tend to encourage you to stay in one place and compose from there. As we'll see later, there can be a great difference in images shot from different locations. But zoom lenses also keep you from having to visualize a scene for a particular framing. Here are three quick exercises that will get you seeing and thinking in a different way Full wide Zoom your lens out to full wide and leave it there Spend a few hours shooting with it at full wide. Don't zoom the...

Recovering Deleted Images

There will probably come a day when you will accidentally delete an image, or even accidentally format your camera's media card. You might be able to recover deleted images from your camera's media card. The reason it's possible to recover files that have been erased is that when you delete a file, the camera doesn't actually erase the image data. Instead, it removes that image's entry from the directory of contents on the card and marks that image's space as available. Even if you have already...

Configuring Your Mac for Image Transfer

You can tell your Mac what you want to have happen when you plug in a camera or media card reader. This makes it simple to choose what software you want to use to transfer your images. By default, when you plug a camera or card reader into your Mac, Image Capture will open automatically, and will present a window for managing the transfer of images. Image Capture is included on all Macs and provides a simple way to manage the transfer of images from a camera or media card reader. Image Capture...

Lowlight autofocus problems

Sometimes your scene lacks contrast because it's too dark. When this happens, the camera may have trouble locking focus. If you hear the camera focus in and out for a while and it still doesn't lock focus, then probably the scene is too dark for the autofocus mechanism to work. To give the camera some help, pop up the built-in flash. Now when you press the shutter button halfway down, the camera will fire some quick flash bursts to illuminate the scene. This extra light can help it lock focus....

Using Adobe Photoshop

The full version of Photoshop provides all of the features of Photoshop Elements, along with some more high-end features that you may or may not need. If you think you might need the ability to prepare images for offset printing, or if you routinely work with high-end 3D imaging, scientific, or video film production software, then Photoshop will be a welcome addition to your toolbox. Otherwise, it's probably overkill for your photo editing needs, and the money you'd spend on the full-blown...