Adjusting Color Saturation

Saturation refers to the intensity and purity of color. A fully saturated color contains no black, white, or gray. In other words, saturated colors are deep, rich, and bold. I find that the colors produced by the Rebel XTi 400D are already pretty highly saturated, but on occasion, an image can benefit from a little saturation bump in the digital darkroom. Figure 10-9 offers an example. I was drawn to this scene by the mix of colors, and the original photo, shown on the left in the figure,...

Working with Memory Cards

Canon T90 Memory Card

Instead of recording images on film, digital cameras store pictures on memory cards. Some people, in fact, refer to memory cards as digital film, but I hate that term because film and memory cards actually have little in common. Film must be developed before you can view your pictures, a process that involves time and some not-so-nice chemicals. Film can be damaged when exposed to some airport security scanners memory cards are immune to those devices. The cost per picture is also much higher...

Rotate the Main dial to select the shutter speed

Refer to Figure 7-7 to locate shutter speed on the Camera Settings display. After you select the shutter speed, the camera selects an aperture (f-stop) to match. What shutter speed you need depends on the speed at which your subject is moving, so some experimentation is needed. But generally speaking, 1 500 second should be plenty for all but the fastest subjects speeding hockey players like my subject, race cars, boats, and so on. For slower subjects, you can even go as low as 1 250 or 1 125...

Aperture setting fstop

Aperture is one of three exposure settings, all explained fully in Chapter 5. Depth of field increases as you stop down the aperture by choosing a higher f-stop number . For shallow depth of field, open the aperture by choosing a lower f-stop number . Figure 6-9 offers an example. Notice that the trees in the background are much more softly focused in the f 5.6 example than in the f 11 version. I snapped both images using the same focal length and camera-to-subject distance, so aperture is the...

Decoding Viewfinder Data

When the camera is turned on, you can view critical exposure settings and a few other pieces of information in the viewfinder as well as on the Camera Settings display. The viewfinder data changes depending on what action you're currently undertaking. For example, when you press the shutter button halfway, you see the current f-stop aperture setting , shutter speed, and exposure meter, as shown in Figure 1-13. Figure 1-13 You also can view some camera information at the bottom of the...

Viewing Your Photos on a Television

How Connect Canon 350d

Your Rebel XTi 400D is equipped with a video-out port, which is tucked under the little rubber cover on the left rear side of the camera, as shown in Figure 9-16. That feature means that you can output your pictures for display on a television screen. To take advantage of this option, dig through your camera box until you find the video cable, which has little yellow plug ends like the one you see on the right in Figure 9-16. Then, making sure that the camera is off, use the cable to connect...

Changing the AF autofocus mode

Your camera offers three different autofocusing schemes, which you select through a control called AF mode. The three choices work like so 1 One-Shot In this mode, which is geared to shooting stationary subjects, the camera locks focus when you depress the shutter button halfway. Focus remains locked as long as you hold the shutter button at that halfway position. 1 AI Servo In this mode, the camera adjusts focus continually as needed from the time you press the shutter button halfway to the...

Decoding the Quality Options

Resolution Canon Menu

As I mentioned in the introduction to this chapter, the Quality control determines both the image resolution and file format of the pictures you shoot. To access the control, press the Menu button and then display Shooting Menu 1, shown on the left in Figure 3-2. Highlight Quality and press the Set button to display the screen you see on the right in the figure. Figure 3-2 You set resolution and file format together via the Quality menu. Figure 3-2 You set resolution and file format together...

Using an external flash unit

Canon Built Flash Concentrate

In addition to its built-in flash, your camera has a hot shoe, which is photo-geek terminology for a connection that enables you to add an external flash head like the one shown in Figure 5-29. The figure features the Canon Speedlite 580EX II, which currently retails for right around 350. Although certainly not the cheapest of camera accessories, an external flash may be a worthwhile investment if you do a lot of flash photography, especially portraits. For one thing, an external flash offers...

Adjusting the Viewfinder Focus

Perched on the top right edge of the viewfinder is a tiny black knob, officially called the dioptric adjustment control. I labeled the knob in Figure 1-4. With this control, you can adjust the magnification of the viewfinder to mesh with your eyesight. If you don't take this step, scenes that appear out-of-focus through the viewfinder may actually be sharply focused through the lens, and vice versa. Here's how to make the necessary adjustment 1. Remove the lens cap from the front of the lens....

Focusing and zooming the tens

Like any modern camera, digital or film, yours offers autofocusing capabilities, which you can explore in detail in Chapters 2 and 6. But with some subjects, autofocusing can be slow or impossible, which is why your camera also offers manual focusing. The process is quick and easy You just turn the focusing ring on the lens until your subject comes into focus. To try it out, take these steps 1. Locate the AF MF switch on the side of the lens. Figure 1-3 shows you the switch as it appears on the...

Adjusting flash power with flash exposure compensation

When you shoot with your built-in flash, the camera attempts to adjust the flash output as needed to produce a good exposure in the current lighting conditions. On some occasions, you may find that you want a little more or less light than the camera thinks is appropriate. You can adjust the flash output by using a feature called flash compensation. This feature works similarly to exposure compensation, discussed earlier in this chapter. But flash compensation affects the output level of the...

Correcting colors with white balance

Every light source emits a particular color cast. The old-fashioned fluorescent lights found in most public restrooms, for example, put out a bluish-greenish light, which is why our reflections in the mirrors in those restrooms always look so sickly. And if you think that your beloved looks especially attractive by candlelight, you aren't imagining things Candlelight casts a warm, yellow-red glow that is flattering to the skin. Science-y types measure the color of light, officially known as...

Selecting a Picture Style

When you set the Mode dial to Full Auto or any of the other fully automatic exposure modes, the camera selects a Picture Style for you. In P, Tv, Av, M, and A-DEP modes, however, you can specify which of the Picture Styles you want to use. You can access Picture Styles through Shooting Menu 2, as shown on the left in Figure 6-27. Just highlight the Picture Styles option and press Set to display the screenful of options you see on the right in the figure. (You can see only five of the Picture...