A

Re you old enough to remember the Certs television commercials from the 1960s and '70s It's a candy mint declared one actor. It's a breath mint argued another. Then a narrator declared the debate a tie and spoke the famous catchphrase It's two, two, two mints in one Well, that's sort of how I see the Rebel T1i 500D. On one hand, it provides a full range of powerful controls, offering just about every feature a serious photographer could want. On the other, it also offers fully automated...

Resolution recommendations

As you can see, resolution is a bit of a sticky wicket. What if you aren't sure how large you want to print your images What if you want to print your photos and share them online I take the better safe than sorry route, which leads to the following recommendations about whether to choose Large, Medium, or Small when you select a Quality setting Always shoot at a resolution suitable for print. You then can create a low-resolution copy of the image in your photo editor for use online. Chapter 9...

Diagnosing Quality Problems

When I use the term picture quality, I'm not talking about the composition, exposure, or other traditional characteristics of a photograph. Instead, I'm referring to how finely the image is rendered in the digital sense. Figure 3-1 illustrates the concept The first example is a high-quality image, with clear details and smooth color transitions. The other examples show five common digital-image defects. High quality Pixelation JPEG artifacts High quality Pixelation JPEG artifacts Figure 3-1...

Changing the Drive Mode

The Drive mode enables you to tell the camera what to do when you press the shutter button record a single frame, a series of frames, or record one or more shots after a short delay. Your camera offers the following Drive mode settings, which are represented by the symbols you see in the margin Single This setting, which is the default for Creative Auto and all fully automatic modes except Portrait and Sports, records a single image each time you press the shutter button. In other words, this...

Working with Memory Cards

Instead of recording images on film, digital cameras store pictures on memory cards. Your Rebel T1i 500D uses a specific type of memory card called an SD card (for Secure Digital), shown in Figures 1-5 and 1-6. You can also use high-capacity SD cards, which carry the label SDHC. (The high-capacity part just means that you can store more files on these cards than on regular SD cards.) For movie recording, Canon recommends that you purchase a high-capacity card that carries an SD speed class...

Raw CR The purists choice

The other picture-file type that you can create on your Rebel is Camera Raw, or just Raw (as in uncooked) for short. Each manufacturer has its own flavor of Raw files Canon's are called CR2 files (or, on some older cameras, CRW). If you use a Windows computer, you see that three-letter designation at the end of your picture filenames. Raw is popular with advanced, very demanding photographers, for two reasons Greater creative control With JPEG, internal camera software tweaks your images,...

Automatic scene modes aka Image Zone modes

In Full Auto mode, the camera tries to figure out what type of picture you want to take by assessing what it sees through the lens. If you don't want to rely on the camera to make that judgment, your camera offers six other fully automatic modes that are specifically designed for taking popular categories of pictures. For example, most people prefer portraits that have softly focused backgrounds. So in Portrait mode, the camera selects settings that can produce that type of background. These...

Exploring External Camera Controls

Scattered across your camera's exterior are a number of buttons, dials, and switches that you use to change picture-taking settings, review and edit your photos, and perform various other operations. Later chapters discuss all of your camera's functions in detail and provide the exact steps to follow to access those functions. The next three sections provide a basic road map to the external controls plus a quick introduction to each. Your virtual tour begins on the top-right side of the camera,...

Landscape mode

Whereas Portrait mode aims for a very shallow depth of field (small zone of sharp focus), Landscape mode, which is designed for capturing scenic vistas, city skylines, and other large-scale subjects, produces a large depth of field. As a result, objects both close to the camera and at a distance appear sharply focused, as shown in Figure 2-10. Like Portrait mode, Landscape mode achieves the greater depth of field by manipulating the exposure settings specifically, the aperture, or f-stop...

Sports mode

Vi Sports mode results in a number of settings that can help you photograph moving subjects, such as the soccer player in Figure 2-12. First, the camera selects a fast shutter speed, which is needed to stop motion. Shutter speed is an exposure control that you can explore in Chapter 5. Also, keep these Sports mode settings in mind Picture Style The camera automatically sets the Picture Style option to Standard, which is designed to produce sharp images with bold colors. Drive mode To enable...

Exposure Compensation value

This option, also detailed in Chapter 5, enables you to produce a brighter or darker image than the camera's autoexposure meter thinks appropriate. If you applied exposure compensation when you take a picture, the compensation amount appears to the right of the f-stop during playback. Otherwise, this area of the display is empty. Figure 4-10 The most basic Playback mode displays your image with minimal shooting information. Figure 4-10 The most basic Playback mode displays your image with...

JPEG The imaging and Web standard

Canon 1000d Jpeg Raw Quality

Pronounced jay-peg, this format is the default setting on your camera, as it is for most digital cameras. JPEG is popular for two main reasons Immediate usability JPEG is a longtime standard format for digital photos. All Web browsers and e-mail programs can display JPEG files, so you can share them online immediately after you shoot them. You also can get JPEG photos printed at any retail outlet, whether it's an online or local printer. Additionally, any program that has photo capabilities,...

Table of Contents

1 A Quick Look at What's Part I Fast Track to Super Part II Taking Creative Part III Working with Picture Part IV The Part of Icons and Other Stuff to About the Software Shown in This Practice, Be Patient, and Have Part I Fast Track to Super Chapter 1 Getting the Lay of the Land 9 Getting Comfortable with Your Attaching a Removing a Using an IS (image stabilizer) Shifting from autofocus to manual Zooming in and Adjusting the Viewfinder Working with Memory Exploring External Camera Topside...

Reviewing Basic Setup Options

One of the many advantages of investing in the Rebel T1i 500D is that you can customize its performance to suit the way you like to shoot. Later chapters explain options related to actual picture taking, such as those that affect flash behavior and autofocusing. The rest of this chapter details options related to initial camera setup, explaining how to accomplish such things as setting the date and time, setting up the camera's file-numbering system, and adjusting monitor brightness. At the...

Pixels and screen display size

Resolution doesn't affect the quality of images viewed on a monitor, television, or other screen device the way it does on printed photos. Instead, it determines the size at which the image appears. This issue is one of the most misunderstood aspects of digital photography, so I explain it thoroughly in Chapter 9. For now, just know that you need way fewer pixels for onscreen photos than you do for printed photos. For example, Figure 3-5 shows a 450-x-300-pixel image that I attached to an...

Getting Comfortable with Your Lens

One of the biggest differences between a point-and-shoot camera and an SLR single-lens reflex camera is the lens. With an SLR, you can swap out lenses to suit different photographic needs, going from an extreme close-up lens to a super-long telephoto, for example. Additionally, an SLR lens has a movable focusing ring that gives you the option of focusing manually instead of relying on the camera's autofocus mechanism. Of course, those added capabilities mean that you need a little background...

Viewing and Adjusting Camera Settings

You've no doubt already deduced that your Rebel T1i 500D is loaded with options. It also gives you several ways to monitor the current settings and to adjust them if needed. The next sections provide just a quick introduction to viewing and changing settings in later chapters, I explain and illustrate exactly how and where to access individual options. Note, too, that the information here relates to regular shooting modes if you switch to Live View or Movie mode, things work differently. You...

CloseUp mode

Switching to Close-Up mode doesn't enable you to focus at a closer distance to your subject than normal as it does on some non-SLR cameras. The close-focusing capabilities of your camera depend entirely on the lens you use. But choosing Close-Up mode does tell the camera to try to select an aperture f-stop setting that results in a short depth of field, which blurs background objects so that they don't compete for attention with your main subject. I used this setting to capture the orchid in...

Decoding the Quality Options

- Your camera's Quality setting determines both the image resolution and file format of the pictures you shoot. To access the control, you can go two routes Quick Control screen After displaying the Shooting Settings screen, press Set to shift to Quick Control mode and use the cross keys to highlight the Quality icon, as shown on the left screen in Figure 3-2. You can then rotate the Main dial to cycle through the available Quality settings. Or, if you prefer, press Set to display the screen...

Peripheral illumin correct Redeye OnOff

Figure 2-6 Turn Red-Eye Reduction flash mode on and off via Shooting Menu 1. The viewfinder and Shooting Settings display don't offer any indication that Red-Eye Reduction is enabled. But you can check the setting by pressing the Menu button and then the DISP button. The Camera Settings display appears look for the little eyeball icon and the word On or Off, as shown in Figure 2-7. After you press the shutter button halfway in Red-Eye Reduction flash mode, a row of vertical bars appears in the...

Adjusting the Viewfinder Focus

Canon Rebel T1i Example Viewfinder

Perched on the top-right edge of the viewfinder is a tiny black knob, labeled in Figure 1-4. Officially known as a dioptric adjustment control, this knob enables you to adjust the magnification of the viewfinder to mesh with your eyesight. Viewfinder adjustment knob Autofocus point Viewfinder adjustment knob Autofocus point Figure 1-4 Use the little knob to set the viewfinder focus for your eyesight. Figure 1-4 Use the little knob to set the viewfinder focus for your eyesight. Adjusting the...

Rotate the Main dial

How many images you advance, and whether you see movies as well as still photos, depends on the Jump mode you select. If you select any Jump setting but 1 Image, a jump bar appears at the bottom of the monitor, as shown in Figure 4-5, indicating the current Jump setting. If you want to view the bar in 1 Image mode, press the up cross key. After the bar appears, you can change the Jump setting without having to return to Playback Menu 2. Instead, just press...

Press the right cross key to highlight Erase and then press the Set button

Figure 4-20 Highlight Erase and press Set to delete the current image. Figure 4-20 Highlight Erase and press Set to delete the current image. Your picture is zapped into digital oblivion. If you accidentally erase a picture, don't panic you may be able to restore it by using data-restoration software. One memory card manufacturer, SanDisk, even provides this type of software free with some of its memory cards. You also can buy stand-alone programs such as MediaRecover 30, www.mediarecover.com...

Considering Resolution Large Medium or Small

To decide upon a Quality setting, the first decision you need to make is how many pixels you want your image to contain. Pixels are the little square tiles from which all digital images are made the word pixel is short for picture element. You can see some pixels close up in the right image in Figure 3-4, which shows a greatly magnified view of the eye area in the left image. Figure 3-4 Pixels are the building blocks of digital photos. Figure 3-4 Pixels are the building blocks of digital...