Pixels and screen display size

Resolution doesn't affect the quality of images viewed on a monitor, television, or other screen device as it does on printed photos. Instead, it determines the size at which the image appears. This issue is one of the most misunderstood aspects of digital photography, so I explain it thoroughly in Chapter 9. For now, just know that you need way fewer pixels for onscreen photos than you do for printed photos. For example, Figure 3-6 shows a 450-x-300-pixel image that I attached to an e-mail...

Decoding Viewfinder Data

When the camera is turned on, you can view critical exposure settings and a few other pieces of information in the viewfinder. Just put your eye to the viewfinder and press the shutter button halfway to activate the viewfinder display. (I'm assuming that Live View mode, in which you use the monitor as viewfinder, is disabled, as it is by default. See Chapter 4 if you want more details about Live View.) The viewfinder data changes depending on what action you're currently undertaking and what...

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Shutter speed Aperture Figure 7-2 You can view exposure settings in the Shooting Settings display or viewfinder. 2. To further soften the background, zoom in, get closer, or both. As covered in Chapter 6, zooming in to a longer focal length also reduces depth of field, as does moving physically closer to your subject. Avoid using a lens with a short focal length (a wide-angle lens) for portraits. They can cause features to appear distorted sort of like how people look when you view them through...

Raw CR The purists choice

The other picture-file type that you can create on your camera is Camera Raw, or just Raw (as in uncooked) for short. Each manufacturer has its own flavor of Raw files Canon's are called CR2 files (or, on some older cameras, CRW). If you use a Windows computer, you see that three-letter designation at the end of your picture filenames. Raw is popular with advanced, very demanding photographers, for two reasons Greater creative control With JPEG, internal camera software tweaks your images,...

Setting Up for Specific Scenes

For the most part, the settings detailed in the preceding section fall into the set 'em and forget 'em category. That leaves you free to concentrate on a handful of other camera options, such as aperture and shutter speed, that you can manipulate to achieve a specific photographic goal. The next four sections explain which of these additional options typically produce the best results when you're shooting portraits, action shots, landscapes, and close-ups. I offer a few compositional and...

Locate the proper lens mounting index on the camera body

A mounting index is simply a marker that tells you where to align the lens with the camera body when connecting the two. Your camera has two of these markers, one red and one white, as shown in Figure 1-1. Which marker you use to align your lens depends on the lens type Canon EF-S lens Align the lens mounting index with the white square on the camera body. Canon EF lens Align the lens mounting index with the red dot instead. If you buy a non-Canon lens, check the lens manual for help with this...

Ordering from Camera Menus

You access many of your camera's features via internal menus, which, conveniently enough, appear when you press the Menu button, located atop the upper-left corner of the camera monitor. Features are grouped into seven main menus, described briefly in Table 1-1. Picture Quality settings, Red-Eye Reduction flash mode, and a few other basic camera settings. Advanced photography options such as flash exposure compensation and automatic exposure bracketing. Menu appears only when you use advanced...

Press and hold the shutter button halfway down

The camera's autofocus and autoexposure meters begin to do their thing. In dim light, the flash may pop up if the camera thinks additional light is needed. Additionally, the flash may shoot out an AF-assist beam, emitting a few rapid pulses of light designed to help the autofocusing mechanism find its target. (The AF stands for autofocus.) At the same time, the autoexposure meter analyzes the light and selects initial aperture (f-stop) and shutter speed settings, which are two critical exposure...

JPEG The imaging and Web standard

Pronounced jay-peg, this format is the default setting on your camera, as it is for most digital cameras. JPEG is popular for two main reasons Web compatibility All Web browsers and e-mail programs can display JPEG files, so you can share them online immediately after you shoot them. Small files JPEG files are smaller than those produced by the other common format offered by today's digital cameras, known as Camera Raw, or just Raw. And smaller files means that your pictures consume less room...

The Part of Tens

For that kind of retouching work, you need a more sophisticated photo editor. Chapter 8 offers some recommendations. Most figures in this chapter feature the Windows versions of the Canon software. Although the Mac version looks different, the retouching steps are the same unless I state otherwise. For simplicity's sake, I refer to ZoomBrowser EX and ImageBrowser generically in the instructions here as just the browser. Finally, Canon occasionally posts...

Monitor Matters Picture Playback and Live View Shooting

Exploring picture playback functions Viewing images on the camera monitor Deciphering the picture information displays Understanding the exposure histogram Deleting bad pictures and protecting great ones Using your monitor as a viewfinder in Live View mode MMyithout question, my favorite thing about digital photography is being able to view my pictures on the camera monitor the instant after I shoot them. No more guessing whether I captured the image I wanted or need to try again no more...

Setup Menu

Setup Menu 2, shown in Figure 1-16, offers an additional batch of customization options. But you can take advantage of only the following options in all exposure modes Full Auto, Manual, Portrait, and so on LCD Brightness This option enables you to make the camera monitor brighter or darker. After highlighting the option on the menu, as shown in Figure 1-16, press Set to display a screen similar to what you see in Figure 1-17. The camera displays a picture from your memory card in the main...

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Set the AF autofocus mode to AI Servo continuous-servo auto- focus . Press the right cross key to access this setting. Chapter 6 details these autofocus options. 6. Turn off automatic image review to speed up the camera even more. You do this via the Review Time option on Shooting Menu 1. Turning the option off can help speed up the time your camera needs to recover between shots. 7. Compose the subject to allow for movement across the frame. You can always crop the photo later to a tighter...

Recapping Basic Picture Settings

Your subject, creative goals, and lighting conditions determine which settings you should use for some picture-taking options, such as aperture and shutter speed. I offer my take on those options throughout this chapter. But for a few basic options, I recommend the same settings for almost every shooting scenario. Table 7-1 lists these options as well as how you access them. Figure 7-1 offers a reminder of where to find the buttons that are referenced in the table. The ISO button isn't fully...

Ten Fast Photo Editing Tricks

Using the editing tools in Canon ZoomBrowser EX and ImageBrowser Correcting exposure and color problems Creating the illusion of sharper focus very photographer produces a clunker image now and then. When it happens to you, don't be too quick to reach for the Erase button on your camera. Many common problems are surprisingly easy to fix using the tools found in most photo editing programs. In fact, you can perform many common retouching tasks using one of the free programs provided with your...

Rotating Vertical pictures

When you take a picture, the camera can record the image orientation that is, whether you held the camera normally, creating a horizontally oriented image, or turned the camera on its side to shoot a vertically oriented photo. This bit of data is simply added into the picture file. Then when you view the picture, the camera reads the data and rotates the image so that it appears upright in the monitor, as shown on the left in Figure 4-5. The image is also rotated automatically when you view it...

Printing and Sharing Your Photos

Setting the stage for great prints Looking at retail printing options Printing using the Canon software Preparing a picture for the Web Creating a slide show Viewing images on a TV hen my first digital photography book was published, way back in the WW 1990s, consumer digital cameras didn't offer the resolution needed to produce good prints at anything more than postage-stamp size and even then, the operative word was good, not great. And if you did want a print, it was a pretty much a...

Automatic scene modes aka Image Zone modes

In Full Auto mode, the camera tries to figure out what type of picture you want to take by assessing what it sees through the lens. If you don't want to rely on the camera to make that judgment, your camera offers six other fully automatic modes that are specifically designed for taking popular categories of pictures. For example, most people prefer portraits that have softly focused backgrounds. So in Portrait mode, the camera selects settings that can produce that type of background. These...

Exploring External Camera Controls

Scattered across your camera's exterior are a number of buttons, dials, and switches that you use to change picture-taking settings, review and edit your photos, and perform various other operations. In later chapters, I discuss all of your camera's functions in detail and provide the exact steps to follow to access those functions. This section provides just a basic road map to the external controls plus a quick introduction to each. You may want to put a sticky note or other bookmark on this...

Ten Special Purpose Features to Explore on a Rainy

Customizing the function of the Set button Changing the focus and exposure locking controls Disabling the autofocus-assist beam Using mirror lockup for shake-free shooting Recording Dust Delete Data Wallpapering your computer monitor with a favorite image Creating custom menus m onsider this chapter the literary equivalent of the end of one of those late-night infomercial offers the part where the host exclaims, But wait There's more The ten features covered in these pages fit the category of...

Qff Auto n

R cn n 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 3 10 11 12 The technique you use to change the exposure settings depends on the exposure mode, as outlined in the following list P programmed auto In this mode, the camera initially displays its recommended combination of aperture and shutter speed. To select a different combination, rotate the Main dial. To select a lower f-stop number larger aperture and faster shutter speed, rotate the dial to the right. To select a higher f-stop number smaller aperture and slower...

Controlling ISO

As explained at the start of this chapter, your camera's ISO setting controls how sensitive the image sensor is to light. At higher ISO values, you need less light to expose an image. Remember the downside to raising ISO however The higher the ISO, the greater the possibility of noisy images. See Figure 5-7 for a reminder of what that defect looks like. In the fully automatic exposure modes, the camera selects an ISO from 100 to 800, depending on the available light. You have no control over...

Erasing single images

To delete photos one at a time, take these steps 1. Select the image that you want to delete. If you are viewing images in single-frame mode, just display the image on the monitor. In index display mode, use the cross keys to move the highlight box over the image thumbnail. It's the one with the little trash can icon, as shown in the margin here. Two options Cancel and Erase appear at the bottom of the screen, as shown in Figure 4-19. 3. Highlight Erase and then press the Set button. Your...

Shooting Information display

In the Shooting Information display mode, the camera presents a thumbnail of your image along with scads of shooting data, as shown in Figure 4-11. Remember Just press the DISP button to cycle through display modes. The chart-like thingy on the right side of the screen is an exposureevaluation tool known as a histogram. You can get schooled in reading histograms in the next section. Figure 4-11 You can view more data in any areas f the image thumbnail Shooting Information playback mode. are...

Flash in Advanced Exposure Modes

Sometimes, no amount of fiddling with aperture, shutter speed, and ISO produces a bright enough exposure in which case, you simply have to add more light. The built-in flash on your camera offers the most convenient solution. To pop up the flash, press the Flash button on the side of the camera, highlighted in Figure 5-22. To turn off the flash, just press down on the flash assembly to close it. As you can in the fully automatic Flash button modes, you also can set the flash to Red-Eye...

F I f I f

Figure 5-11 In manual mode, the meter indicates whether exposure settings are on target. Because the meter is designated as an exposure compensation guide when you shoot in the P, Tv, Av, and A-DEP modes, the camera alerts you to exposure problems in those modes as follows Av mode aperture-priority autoexposure The shutter speed value blinks to let you know that the camera can't select a shutter speed that will produce a good exposure at the aperture you selected. You need to choose a different...

Controlling Picture Quality

Reviewing factors that lead to poor photo quality Exploring resolution, pixels, and ppi Calculating the right resolution for traditional print sizes Understanding the tradeoff between picture quality and file size Deciding on the best file format JPEG or Raw Picking the right JPEG quality level A lmost every review of the Rebel XS 1000D contains glowing reports about the camera's top-notch picture quality. As you've no doubt discovered for yourself, those claims are true, too This baby can...

Jumping through images

If your memory card contains scads of images, here's a trick you'll love By using the Jump feature, you can rotate the Main dial to leapfrog through pic-l 0 tures instead of pressing the right or left cross key a bazillion times to get to the picture you want to see. You also can search for the first image shot on a specific date. 1. Press the Playback button to put the camera into Playback mode. The jump bar appears at the bottom of the monitor, as shown in Figure 4-3. 3. Select a Jump mode...

Coping with Special Situations

Lastolite Light Diffuser

A few subjects and shooting situations pose some additional challenges not already covered in earlier sections. So to wrap up this chapter, here's a quick list of ideas for tackling a variety of common tough-shot photos Shooting through glass To capture subjects that are behind glass, try putting your lens flat against the glass. Then switch to manual focusing the glass barrier can give the autofocus mechanism fits. Disable your flash to avoid creating any unwanted reflections, too. I used this...

Viewing Images in Playback Mode

To switch your camera to Playback mode and view the images currently on your memory card, take these steps 1. Press the Playback button, labeled in Figure 4-2 and shown in the margin here. The monitor displays the last picture you took along with some shooting data. To find out how to interpret the picture data and specify what data you want to see, see the upcoming section Viewing Picture Data. If you're curious about your options now, though, press the DISP button to cycle through the...

Understanding your cameras approach to flash

STo When you use flash, your camera automatically calculates the flash power . iiix needed to illuminate the subject. This process is sometimes referred to as flash metering. Your Rebel XS 1000D uses a flash-metering system that Canon calls E-TTL II. The E stands for evaluative TTL, for through the lens. And the II refers to the fact that this system is an update to the first version of the system. It isn't important that you remember what the initials stand for or even the flash system's...

Introducing the Exposure Trio Aperture Shutter Speed and ISO

Iso Aperture Shutter Speed

Any photograph, whether taken with a film or digital camera, is created by focusing light through a lens onto a light-sensitive recording medium. In a film camera, the film negative serves as that medium in a digital camera, it's the image sensor, which is an array of light-responsive computer chips. Between the lens and the sensor are two barriers, known as the aperture and shutter, which together control how much light makes its way to the sensor. The actual design and arrangement of the...

Manipulating Focus and Color

Controlling the camera's autofocusing performance Choosing an autofocus mode Autofocusing in Live View mode Understanding focal lengths, depth of field, and other focus factors Exploring white balance and its affect on color Stretching your color palette with Adobe RGB Tweaking color and sharpening via Picture Styles 7o many people, the word focus has just one interpretation when applied to a photograph Either the subject is in focus or it's blurry. And it's true, this characteristic of your...

Full Auto mode

In this mode, represented on the Mode dial by the rectangle you see in the margin here, the camera selects all settings based on the scene that it detects in front of the lens. Your only job is to lock in focus, using the two- stage autofocus technique I outline at the beginning of the chapter, or by setting the lens to manual focus mode and using the focus ring on the lens, as explained in Chapter 1. Full Auto mode is great for casual, quick snapshooting. But keep these limitations in mind...

Exploring Other Software Options

The Canon browser software is a nifty tool for viewing and organizing your photos. And it enables you to perform basic retouching You can crop your image and make some adjustments to color, exposure, and sharpness. Chapter 10 shows you how. But the program isn't designed for serious photo editing. For one thing, you can't perform selective editing changing only the part of your image that needs help. And you don't get any tools for removing flaws such as blemishes in portraits and the like. So...

Working with Picture Files

Rich Tennant

Time to ireshen the cowpatt-g Web page.11 IXou've got a memory card full of pictures. Now what Now you turn to the first chapter in this part, which explains how to get those pictures out of your camera and onto your computer and, just as important, how to safeguard them from future digital destruction. After downloading your files, head for Chapter 9, which offers step-by-step guidance on printing your pictures, sharing them online, and even viewing them on your television.

Changing the white balance setting

Canon White Balance Symbols

To switch from automatic to manual white balancing, follow these steps 1. Set the camera Mode dial to P, Tv, Av, M, or A-DEP. You can tweak white balance only in these advanced exposure modes. You see the White Balance screen, shown on the left in Figure 6-18. Figure 6-18 Press the WB button to access white balance options. Figure 6-18 Press the WB button to access white balance options. 3. Press the right or left cross key to highlight the setting you want to use. As you scroll through the...

Diagnosing Quality Problems

When I use the term picture quality, I'm not talking about the composition, exposure, or other traditional characteristics of a photograph. Instead, I'm referring to how finely the image is rendered in the digital sense. Figure 3-1 illustrates the concept The first example is a high-quality image, with clear details and smooth color transitions. The other examples show five common digital-image defects. High quality Pixelation JPEG artifacts High quality Pixelation JPEG artifacts Figure 3-1...

Choosing an Exposure Metering Mode

Camera Exposure Metering

The metering mode determines which part of the frame the camera analyzes to calculate the proper exposure. Your Rebel XS 1000D offers three metering modes, described in the following list and represented in the Shooting Settings display by the icons you see in the margins Evaluative metering The camera analyzes the entire frame and then selects an exposure that's designed to produce a balanced exposure. Partial metering The camera bases exposure only on the light that covers approximately the...

Understanding File Type JPEG or

In addition to establishing the resolution of your photos, the Quality setting determines the file format. The file format simply refers to the type of image file that the camera produces. Your Canon offers two file formats, JPEG and Raw, with a couple variations of each. The next sections explain the pros and cons of each setting. Don't confuse file format with the Format option on Setup Menu 1. That option erases all data on your memory card see Chapter 1 for details.

Protecting Photos

You can protect pictures from accidental erasure by giving them protected status. After you take this step, the camera doesn't allow you to delete a picture with the Erase Images function. Formatting your memory card, however, does erase even protected pictures. See the nearby sidebar for more about formatting. The picture protection feature comes in especially handy if you share a camera with other people. You can protect pictures so that those other people know that they shouldn't delete your...

Getting Creative with Exposure and Lighting

Exploring advanced exposure modes P, Tv, Av, M, or A-DEP Understanding the basics of exposure Getting a grip on aperture, shutter speed, and ISO Tweaking autoexposure with exposure compensation Experimenting with exposure Custom Functions Using flash in the advanced exposure modes y using the fully automatic modes covered in Chapter 2, you can take great pictures with your Rebel XS 1000D. But to really exploit your camera's capabilities and, more important, to exploit your creative capabilities...

Attaching a lens

Your camera can accept two categories of Canon lenses those with a so-called EF-S design and those with a plain-old EF design. The EF stands for electro focus the S, for short back focus. And no, you don't really need to remember that little detail but you do need to make sure that if you buy a Canon lens other than the one sold with the camera, it carries either the EF or EF-S specification. If you want to buy a non-Canon lens, check the lens manufacturer's Web site to find out which lenses...

Kicking Your Camera into Advanced Gear

The first step to taking the exposure reins is to set your camera's Mode dial to one of the five shooting modes highlighted in Figure 5-1 P, Tv, Av, M, or A-DEP. You also need to shoot in one of these modes to use certain other camera features, such as manual white balancing, a color feature that you can explore in Chapter 6. Each of the five modes offers a different level of control over two critical exposure settings, aperture and shutter speed. Later in this chapter, I explain these controls...

Controlling Color

Depth Field Button Canon 1000d

Figure 6-15 Press this button to see how the aperture setting will affect depth of field. Compared with understanding some aspects of digital photography resolution, aperture and shutter speed, depth of field, and so on making sense of your camera's color options is easy-breezy. First, color problems aren't all that common, and when they are, they're usually simple to fix with a quick shift of your camera's white balance control. And getting a grip on color requires learning only a couple of...

Correcting colors with white balance

White Balance Light White Statues

Every light source emits a particular color cast. The old-fashioned fluorescent lights found in most public restrooms, for example, put out a bluish-greenish light, which is why our reflections in the mirrors in those restrooms always look so sickly. And if you think that your beloved looks especially attractive by candlelight, you aren't imagining things Candlelight casts a warm, yellow-red glow that is flattering to the skin. Science-y types measure the color of light, officially known as...

Setting ISO fstop and Shutter Speed

If you want to control ISO, aperture f-stop , or shutter speed, you must set the camera to one of the five advanced exposure modes. Formally called Creative Zone modes in Canon nomenclature, these modes include programmed autoexposure P , shutter-priority autoexposure Tv , aperture-priority autoexposure Av , manual exposure M , and auto depth of field A-DEP . I explain each of these modes at the start of the chapter. The next sections provide specifics finally, you say on how to adjust ISO,...

Monitoring Exposure Settings

Exposure Settings Canon

When you press the shutter button halfway, the current f-stop, shutter speed, and ISO speed appear in both the viewfinder display, as shown in Figure 5-9, and in the Shooting Settings display, as shown in Figure 5-10. In Live View mode, the exposure data appears at the bottom of the monitor and takes a form similar to what you see in the viewfinder. The upcoming sidebar provides information about exposure-related aspects of shooting in Live View mode. In the viewfinder and on the monitor in...

Safeguarding your digital photo files

To make sure that your digital photos enjoy a long, healthy life, follow these storage guidelines Don't rely on your computer's hard drive for long-term, archival storage. Hard drives occasionally fail, wiping out all files in the process. This warning applies to both internal and external hard drives. Camera memory cards, flash memory keys, and other portable storage devices are similarly risky. All are easily damaged if dropped or otherwise mishandled. And being of diminutive stature, these...

Locking the flash exposure

You might never notice it, but when you press the shutter button to take a picture with flash enabled, the camera emits a very brief preflash before the actual flash. This preflash is used to determine the proper flash power needed to expose the image. On occasion, the information that the camera collects from the preflash can be off-target because of the assumptions the system makes about what area of the frame is likely to contain your subject. To address this problem, your camera has a...

Doing the exposure balancing act

As you change any of the three exposure settings aperture, shutter speed, and ISO one or both of the others must also shift in order to maintain the same image brightness. If you want a faster shutter speed, for example, you have to compensate with either a larger aperture, to allow in more light during the shorter exposure, or a higher ISO setting, to make the camera more sensitive to the light, or both. And as the preceding section explains, changing these settings impacts your image in ways...

Locking Autoexposure Settings

To help ensure a proper exposure, your camera continually meters the light until the moment you depress the shutter button fully to shoot the picture. In autoexposure modes that is, any mode but M it also keeps adjusting exposure settings as needed. For most situations, this approach works great, resulting in the right settings for the light that's striking your subject at the moment you capture the image. But on occasion, you may want to lock in a certain combination of exposure settings....

White Balance Symbols

How Use Shift Bkt Canon 550d

Figure 6-23 The - symbol lets you know that white balance shift is being applied. H NG Your adjustment remains in force for all the advanced exposure modes until you change it. And the correction is applied no matter what White Balance setting you choose. So make it a point to check the monitor or viewfinder before your next shoot otherwise, you may forget to adjust the white balance for the current light. 6. To cancel White Balance Correction, repeat Steps 1-3, set the marker back to the...

Using your mouse as a shutter button

Along with providing a convenient way for you to download images, the EOS Utility software enables you to use your computer to actually shoot pictures. While your camera is connected to your computer, clicking the Camera Settings Remote Shooting button in the main EOS Utility window displays a panel containing clickable controls for adjusting the major camera settings, such as aperture, white balance, ISO, and metering mode. After you establish those settings, you click another button to record...

Exploring more flash options

Setup Menu 2, shown on the left in Figure 5-29, offers an option called Flash Control. Through this menu item, you can customize a few additional aspects of your camera's built-in flash as well as an external flash head. LCD brightness Qi . 7 . ,i - j Date Time 08 21 08 14 34 Language English Video system NTSC Sensor cleaning Live View function settings External flash func. setting External flash C.Fn setting Clear ext. flash C. Fn set. Figure 5-29 You can customize additional flash options via...

Adjusting aperture and shutter speed

HBEff You can adjust aperture and shutter speed only in P, Tv, Av, and M exposure modes. In A-DEP mode, the camera forces you to use its selected exposure settings. You can, however, tweak the exposure by using the exposure-compensation feature discussed in the next section. To see the current exposure settings, start by pressing the shutter button halfway. The following activities then take place The exposure meter comes to life. If autofocus is enabled, focus is also set at this point. The...

Using Zoom BroWser EXlmage BroWser

Canon Dslr 1000d Different Mode Clicks

In addition to the aforementioned software tools, your Canon CD contains two additional programs ZoomBrowser EX Windows or ImageBrowser Mac , plus Digital Photo Professional. In this section, you can find out how to organize your photos using the ZoomBrowser EX ImageBrowser tool. Although you can view thumbnails of your images in Digital Photo Professional, that tool is designed for advanced users, so I don't cover it in this book. The next sections give you the most basic of introductions to...

Understanding exposuresetting side effects

Shutter Speed Settings Photos

As illustrated by the images in Figure 5-4, you can create the same exposure with different combinations of aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. And although the figure shows you only two variations of settings, your choices are pretty much endless you're limited only by the aperture range allowed by the lens and the shutter speeds and ISO settings offered by the camera. f 13, 1 25 second, ISO 200 f 5.6, 1 125 second, ISO 200 f 13, 1 25 second, ISO 200 f 5.6, 1 125 second, ISO 200 Figure 5-4...

Changing the AF autofocus mode

Your camera offers three different autofocusing schemes, which you select through a control called AF mode. The three choices work like so One-Shot In this mode, which is geared to shooting stationary subjects, the camera locks focus when you depress the shutter button halfway. Focus remains locked as long as you hold the shutter button at that halfway position. AI Servo In this mode, the camera adjusts focus continually as needed from the time you press the shutter button halfway to the time...

Selecting an autofocus point

Where The Button Rebel

When you shoot in any of the fully automatic exposure modes Full Auto, Portrait, Landscape, and so on as well as in A-DEP mode, all seven of your camera's autofocus points are active. That means that the camera's autofocus-ing system looks at all the points when trying to establish focus. Typically, the camera sets focus on the point that falls over the object closest to the lens. If that focusing decision doesn't suit your needs, you have two options Set the camera to P, Tv, Av, or M exposure...

Rotate the dioptric adjustment knob until the autofocus points appear to be in focus

Don't worry about focusing the actual picture now just pay attention to the autofocus points. If your eyesight is such that you can't get the autofocus points to appear sharp by using the dioptric adjustment control, you can buy an additional eyepiece adapter. This accessory, which you pop onto the eyepiece, just enables further adjustment of the viewfinder display. Prices range from about 15-30 depending on the magnification you need. Look for an adapter called an E-series dioptric adjustment...

Reviewing Focus Basics

I touch on various focus issues in Chapters 1, 2, and 5. But just in case you're not reading this book from front to back, the following steps provide a recap of the basic process of focusing with your Rebel XS 1000D. These steps assume that Live View shooting, introduced in Chapter 4, is not enabled. Focusing works a little differently in Live View mode see the upcoming section Autofocusing in Live View Mode for details. 1. If you haven't already done so, adjust the viewfinder to your...

Working with Memory Cards

Canon 1000d Insert Memory Card

Instead of recording images on film, digital cameras store pictures on memory cards. Your Rebel XS 1000D uses a specific type of memory card called an SD card for Secure Digital , shown in Figures 1-5 and 1-6. Other card types CompactFlash, Memory Stick, or any others aren't compatible with your camera. However, if you use SD cards in your cell phone, portable music player, or other device, you can use the same cards in your camera. Also, your camera can use the new, high-capacity SD cards,...

Select and erase images All images on card

Figure 4-22 Use the up and down cross keys to check the box for images you want to delete. Figure 4-22 Use the up and down cross keys to check the box for images you want to delete. Deleting versus formatting What's the diff In Chapter 1, I introduce you to the Format command, which lives on Setup Menu 1 and erases everything on your memory card. What's the difference between erasing photos by formatting and by using the Erase Images option on the Playback menu to delete all your pictures Well,...

Pixels and print quality

When mulling over resolution options, your first consideration is how large you want to print your photos, because pixel count determines the size at which you can produce a high-quality print. If you don't have enough pixels, your prints may exhibit the defects you see in the pixelation example in Figure 3-1, or worse, you may be able to see the individual pixels, as in the right example in Figure 3-5. Depending on your photo printer, you typically need anywhere from 200 to 300 pixels per...

Using an IS image stabilizer lens

1000d Focus Ring

The 18-55mm lens sold with the Rebel XS 1000D offers a feature called image stabilization. On Canon lenses, this feature is indicated by the initials IS in the lens name. Image stabilization attempts to compensate for small amounts of camera shake that are common when photographers handhold their cameras and use a slow shutter speed, a lens with a long focal length, or both. That camera movement during the exposure can produce blurry images. Although image stabilization can't work miracles, it...

Viewing multiple images at a time

If you want to quickly review and compare several photos, you can set the camera to index display mode and view thumbnails of either four or nine images at a time, as shown in Figure 4-4. Just press the AE Lock button, found on the upper-right corner of the camera back and shown in the margin here. Press once to display four thumbnails at a time press again to display nine thumbnails. Note the little blue checkerboard and magnifying glass icons under the button they're reminders of the function...

Downloading Organizing and Archiving Your Photos

Transferring pictures to your computer Using the free Canon software to download and organize photos Looking at other photo-management and editing programs Processing Raw CR2 files Keeping your picture files safe from harm or many novice digital photographers and even some experienced ones , the task of moving pictures to the computer and then keeping track of all of those image files is one of the more confusing aspects of the art form. In fact, students in my classes have more questions about...

Exploring Picture Styles

Canon 550d Picture Style Settings

In addition to all the focus and color features already covered in this chapter, your Rebel XS 1000D offers Picture Styles. Through Picture Styles, you can further tweak color as well as saturation, contrast, and image sharpening. iffiSTo Sharpening is a software process that adjusts contrast in a way that creates .ix the illusion of slightly sharper focus. I explain sharpening fully in Chapter 10, but the important thing to note for now is that sharpening cannot remedy poor focus, but instead...

Disabling Auto Lighting Optimization

Canon Eos 1000d Error Solution Doc

When you shoot in any of the fully automatic exposure modes, the camera automatically checks each picture for two potential exposure problems a too-dark subject and a lack of contrast. If it detects either, it automatically applies a subtle corrective tweak as it records the picture to the memory card. Canon calls this feature Auto Lighting Optimization. In general, Auto Lighting Optimization is a good thing, which is why the feature is also applied by default in the advanced exposure modes if...

While looking through the viewfinder twist the focusing ring to adjust focus

The focusing ring is at the far end of the lens barrel, as indicated in Figure 1-3. If you have trouble focusing, you may be too close to your subject every lens has a minimum focusing distance. See Chapter 6 for more tips on focus issues. You may also need to adjust the viewfinder to accommodate your eyesight see the next section for details. On a zoom lens, a movable zoom barrel lies behind the focusing ring, as shown in Figure 1-3. To zoom in or out, just move that zoom barrel forward and...

Bracketing Exposures Automatically

One of my favorite exposure features on the Rebel XS 1000D is automatic exposure bracketing, or AEB for short. This feature makes it easy to bracket exposures which simply means to take the same shot using several exposure settings to up the odds that you come away with a perfectly exposed image. When you enable AEB, your first shot is recorded at the current exposure settings the second, with settings that produce a darker image and the third, with settings that produce a brighter image. You...

Creating a custom white balance setting

If none of the preset white balance options produces the right amount of color correction, you can create your own custom setting. To use this technique, you need a piece of card stock that's either neutral gray or absolute white not eggshell white, sand white, or any other close-but-not perfect white. You can buy reference cards made just for this purpose in many camera stores for under 20. Position the reference card so that it receives the same lighting you'll use for your photo. Then take...

Icons and Other Stuff to Note

If this isn't your first For Dummies book, you may be familiar with the large, round icons that decorate its margins. If not, here's your very own icon-decoder ring A Tip icon flags information that will save you time, effort, money, or some other valuable resource, including your sanity. When you see this icon, look alive. It indicates a potential danger zone that can result in much wailing and teeth-gnashing if ignored. Lots of information in this book is of a technical nature digital...

Solving autofocus problems

When you shoot in the fully automatic modes, the camera typically focuses on the closest object. If the camera insists on selecting an autofocus point that isn't appropriate for your subject, the easiest solution is to switch to manual focusing and be done with it. Chapter 1 shows you how. Or you can use the advanced exposure modes, which enable you to select a specific autofocus point. Chapter 6 explains that option plus a few other tips for getting good autofocus results. Shooting moving...

Using Your Monitor as a Viewfinder

Cara Menyetel Custom Functions Canon 20d

If you've used a compact, point-and-shoot digital camera, you may be used to composing your pictures on the camera monitor rather than by looking through the viewfinder. In fact, many compact cameras no longer even offer a viewfinder, which is a real shame, in my opinion. Why Because when you use the monitor to frame the image, you must hold the camera away from your body, a shooting posture that increases the likelihood of blurry images caused by camera shake. When you use the viewfinder, you...

Checking depth of field

When you look through your viewfinder and press the shutter button halfway, you can get only a partial indication of the depth of field that your current camera settings will produce. You can see the effect of focal length and the camera-to-subject distance, but because the aperture doesn't actually open to your selected f-stop until you take the picture, the viewfinder doesn't show you how that setting will affect depth of field. By using the Depth-of-Field Preview button on your camera,...

Live mode

R Cn m 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Figure 6-7 Enable Live View autofocusing through Custom Function 7. 5. Highlight your choice of autofocusing modes and then press Set. The next two sections explain the difference between Quick mode and Live mode autofocusing. After you press Set, your selected option appears in blue text in the menu, as shown on the right in Figure 6-7. The blue always indicates the selected option for Custom Functions. Live View autofocus option 1 Quick mode As its name...

Histogram Brightness Auto play

Figure 4-23 Apply Protect status to prevent accidental erasure of important images. An image appears on the monitor, along with a little key icon in the upper-left corner, as shown on the right in Figure 4-23. 3. Navigate to the picture that you want to protect. Just press the right or left cross key to scroll through your pictures. 4. Press Set to lock the picture. Now a second key icon appears with the data at the top of the screen, as shown in Figure 4-24. 5. To lock more pictures, repeat...

Considering Resolution Large Medium or Small

To decide upon a Quality setting, the first decision you need to make is how many pixels you want your image to contain. Pixels are the little square tiles from which all digital images are made the word pixel is short for picture element. You can see some pixels close up in the right image in Figure 3-5, which shows a greatly magnified view of the eye area of the left image. Figure 3-5 Pixels are the building blocks of digital photos. Figure 3-5 Pixels are the building blocks of digital...

Autofocusing in Live View Mode

Chapter 4 covers the basics of shooting in Live View mode, which enables you to compose your shots by using the camera monitor instead of the viewfinder. As I mention in that discussion, using this photography mode on a digital SLR isn't as simple as it is on a compact point-and-shoot model because of the complexities of SLR design. On the Rebel XS 1000D, shooting in Live View mode requires some tradeoffs, such as not being able to use certain exposure features or any of the fully automatic...

Finetuning White Balance settings

Picture Styles Shift Bkt

As yet another alternative for manipulating colors, your Rebel XS 1000D enables you to tweak white balancing in a way that shifts all colors toward a particular part of the color spectrum. The end result is similar to applying a traditional color filter to your lens. To access this option, called White Balance Correction, take these steps 1. Set the Mode dial to P, Tv, Av, M, or A-DEP exposure mode. You can take advantage of White Balance Correction only in these modes. 2. Display Shooting Menu...

Manipulating Depth of Field

Stop Examples

Getting familiar with the concept of depth of field is one of the biggest steps you can take to becoming a more artful photographer. I introduce you to depth of field in Chapters 2 and 5, but here's a quick recap just to hammer home the lesson II Depth of field refers to the distance over which objects in a photograph appear sharply focused. With a shallow, or small, depth of field, only your subject and objects very close to it appear sharp. Objects at a distance from the subject appear...

Adjusting the Viewfinder Focus

Perched on the top right edge of the viewfinder is a tiny black knob, officially called the dioptric adjustment control. I labeled the knob in Figure 1-4. With this control, you can adjust the magnification of the viewfinder to mesh with your eyesight. If you don't take this step, scenes that appear out-of-focus through the viewfinder may actually be sharply focused through the lens, and vice versa. Figure 1-4 Use the dioptric adjustment control to set the viewfinder focus for your eyesight....

Sending Pictures to the Computer

You can take two approaches to moving pictures from your camera memory card to your computer Connect the camera directly to USB symbol the computer. For this option, you need to dig out the USB cable that came in your camera box. The camera manual refers to the cable as the interface cable. Your computer must also have a free USB slot, or port, in techie talk. If you aren't sure what these gadgets look like, Figure 8-1 gives you a look. The little three-pronged icon you see on the plug and to...

Understanding Histogram display mode

When you switch from Shooting Information display mode to the Histogram display mode, you see the data shown in Figure 4-15. Again, you get the thumbnail view of your image, but this time some of the extensive shooting data is replaced by a second histogram. The next two sections explain what information you can glean from the histograms. See the preceding sections for a map to the other shooting data on the screen. Figure 4-15 Histogram display mode replaces some shooting data with an RGB...

Using Flash in Automatic Exposure Modes

Your options for using flash depend on which of the fully automatic exposure modes you choose, as follows Sports, Landscape, and Flash Off modes Flash is disabled for these modes. For the Flash Off mode, that behavior makes sense, of course. But why no flash in the other two modes Well, Sports mode is designed to enable you to capture moving subjects, and the flash can make that more difficult because it needs time to recycle between shots. On top of that, the maximum shutter speed that's...

Overriding Autoexposure Results with Exposure Compensation

Canon Exposure Dial

When you set your camera to the P, Tv, Av, or A-DEP exposure modes, you can enjoy the benefits of autoexposure support but still retain some control over the final, overall exposure. If you think that the image the camera produced is too dark or too light, you can use a feature known as exposure compensation, which is sometimes also called EV compensation. The EV stands for exposure value. Whatever you call it, this feature enables you to tell the camera to produce a darker or lighter exposure...

Changing the Drive Mode

Your camera offers the following Drive mode settings Single This setting, which is the default for all of the fully automatic modes except Portrait and Sports, records a single image each time you press the shutter button. In other words, this is normal-photography mode. Continuous Sometimes known as burst mode, this setting records a continuous series of images as long as you hold down the shutter button. On the Rebel XS 1000D, you can capture as many as three shots per second. Obviously, this...

Adjusting flash power with flash exposure compensation

Camera Symbol Exposure Flash

When you shoot with your built-in flash, the camera attempts to adjust the flash output as needed to produce a good exposure in the current lighting conditions. On some occasions, you may find that you want a little more or less light than the camera thinks is appropriate. You can adjust the flash output by using a feature called flash exposure compensation. This feature works similarly to exposure compensation, discussed earlier in this chapter. But flash exposure compensation affects the...

Using an external flash unit

Rebel Xsi With External Flash

In addition to its built-in flash, your camera has a hot shoe, which is photo-geek terminology for a connection that enables you to add an external flash head like the one shown in Figure 5-31. The figure features the Canon Speedlite 580EX II, which currently retails for right around 350. Although certainly not the cheapest of camera accessories, an external flash may be a worthwhile investment if you do a lot of flash photography, especially portraits. For one thing, an external flash offers...

Decoding the Quality Options

Your camera's Quality control determines both the image resolution and file format of the pictures you shoot. To access the control, press the Menu button and then display Shooting Menu 1, shown on the left in Figure 3-2. Highlight Quality and press the Set button to display the screen you see on the right in the figure. Figure 3-2 You set resolution and file format together via the Quality menu. Figure 3-3 You can't capture images in the Raw format if you use a fully automatic exposure mode....

Using ADEP mode

In addition to the four advanced exposure modes found on most digital SLR cameras, your Rebel XS 1000D offers a fifth mode called A-DEP, as shown in Figure 6-14. The initials stand for automatic depth of field. This mode is designed to assist you in producing photos that have a depth of field sufficient to keep all objects in the frame in sharp focus. The camera accomplishes this by analyzing the lens-to-subject distance for all those objects and then selecting the aperture that results in the...

Choosing a Color Space sRGB vs Adobe RGB

Canon Srgb Adobe Rgb

Normally, your camera captures images using the sRGB color mode, which simply refers to an industry-standard spectrum of colors. The s is for standard, and the RGB is for red-green-blue, which are the primary colors in the digital imaging color world. This color mode was created to help ensure color consistency as an image moves from camera or scanner to monitor and printer the idea was to create a spectrum of colors that all of these devices can reproduce. However, the sRGB color spectrum...